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NASCAR chairman France says group not talking to IndyCar to make double-duty attempts easier

  • 8fc7a8d683ffe011320f6a706700ba0b.jpg

    NASCAR CEO Brian France answers a question during practice for Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup series Coca-Cola 600 auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., Saturday, May 25, 2013. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn)The Associated Press

  • 3f58be1f83ffe011320f6a70670014bd.jpg

    NASCAR CEO Brian France listens to a question during practice for Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup series Coca-Cola 600 auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., Saturday, May 25, 2013. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn)The Associated Press

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    Denny Hamlin signs autographs before practice for Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup series Coca-Cola 600 auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., Saturday, May 25, 2013. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn)The Associated Press

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    Danica Patrick, right, talks with Greg Zipadelli during practice for Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup series Coca-Cola 600 auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., Saturday, May 25, 2013. (AP Photo/Nell Redmond)The Associated Press

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    Tony Stewart looks at a monitor during practice for Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup series Coca-Cola 600 auto race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C., Thursday, May 23, 2013. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn)The Associated Press

NASCAR chairman Brian France says the organization is not talking with IndyCar about making it easier for drivers who want to try racing in both the Indianapolis 500 and the Coca-Cola 600 on the same day.

France spoke Saturday at Charlotte Motor Speedway and was asked if NASCAR had considered working with IndyCar to open a time window that might let drivers run both events.

France said it wasn't on NASCAR's front burner and that driver's schedules in each discipline make it hard to try the double.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway has shown a willingness to work with NASCAR when track president Jeff Belskus said in December he'd consider moving up the start time so Tony Stewart could run for Roger Penske.

Stewart turned down the offer.