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Mo Farah Wins 10,000m, American Galen Rupp Grabs Silver

Saturday night at the 2012 Summer Olympics belongs to Great Britain on the track.

Shortly after fellow British track stars Jessica Ennis won heptathlon and Greg Rutherford took gold in long jump, Mo Farah won the gold medal in the men's 10,000m, crossing the finish line in 27:30.42 (yep, that's a 4:25-mile pace, run over 6.2 miles, which is insane, of course). Farah, the current World Champion in the 5,000m, becomes the first British athlete ever to win gold in the men's 10,000m.

Just behind him was his training partner, American Galen Rupp, finishing in a time of 27:30.90 to win the silver, a feat that could be considered even more historic than Farah's win. Rupp's medal is just the third ever won by an American in the event in 100 years. And it's the first U.S. medal in the 10,000m since Billy Mills' gold, in 1964.

Ethiopia's Tariku Bekele took the bronze medal (27:31.43), just edging his brother, Kenenisa, the two-time defending champion, by 1.01 seconds. American Dathan Ritzenhein came in 13th place after getting dropped over the final few laps.

Farah and Rupp were together for most of the race, patiently waiting near the middle of group and biding their time. At the halfway mark, Farah found himself in sixth place but began working his way to the front. With two laps to go, Farah had taken the lead, while Rupp kept pace in fourth position. For the final 400m, Farah turned it on and only Rupp was able to keep up with his kick -- they covered the final lap in about 54 seconds:

After the race, Farah called the win the "best moment of his life." But that was pretty clear based solely on his immediate reaction.

While Farah slapping his head in celebration is obviously great, the best part of that GIF is Rupp, just behind him, screaming, "MOOOOO!" Sports are just awesome.

Farah's win snapped a a streak of four straight wins by Ethiopian runners in the event.

Both Farah and Rupp will run for gold in the men's 5,000m on Aug. 11.

For more on the Olympics, check out SB Nation's London 2012 Olympics Hub.