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CUP: New Hall Of Fame Class To Be Announced

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The five members of the 2013 NASCAR Hall of Fame class will be announced Wednesday evening, in what might be the most wide open class to date.

SPEED will televise the event live, with a special preview show at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, followed by the announcement of the 2013 NASCAR Hall of Fame class on NASCAR Race Hub at 6 p.m.

The NHOF’s 2013 inductees will be determined by a voting panel, which includes the entire 21-person nominating committee; media members; manufacturer representatives; retired competitors (drivers, owners, crew chiefs) and recognized industry leaders. In addition fans will get one vote through the now-closed fan voting process.

Unlike years past, there don’t appear to be many favorites, nor do there appear to be any glaring omissions from past classes, so there very well could be some close voting as well as surprise entrants when the names are announced on Wednesday.

Following are the 25 nominees, listed alphabetically:

Buck Baker, first driver to win consecutive NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series titles (1956-57).

Red Byron, first NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series champion, in 1949.

Richard Childress, 11-time car owner champion in NASCAR’s three national series.

Jerry Cook, six-time NASCAR Modified champion.

H. Clay Earles, founder of Martinsville Speedway.

Tim Flock, two-time NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series champion.

Ray Fox, legendary engine builder and owner of cars driven by Buck Baker, Junior Johnson and others.

Anne Bledsoe France, helped build the sport with husband Bill France Sr. Affectionately known as "Annie B.," she is the first woman to be nominated for induction into the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

Rick Hendrick, 13-time car owner champion in NASCAR’s three national series.

Jack Ingram, two-time NASCAR Busch (now Nationwide) Series champion and three-time Late Model Sportsman champion.

Bobby Isaac, 1970 NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series champion.

Fred Lorenzen, 26 wins and winner of the Daytona 500 and World 600.

Cotton Owens, driver-owner, won 1966 owner championship with David Pearson.

Raymond Parks, NASCAR’s first champion car owner.

Benny Parsons, 1973 NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series champion.

Les Richter, former NASCAR executive; former president of Riverside International Raceway.

Fireball Roberts, 33 NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series wins, including the 1962 Daytona 500.

T. Wayne Robertson, helped raise NASCAR popularity as R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company senior VP.

Wendell Scott, NASCAR trailblazer was the first African-American NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series race winner, and first to be nominated for induction into the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

Ralph Seagraves, formed groundbreaking Winston-NASCAR partnership as executive with R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company.

Herb Thomas, first two-time NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series champion, 1951, ’53.

Curtis Turner, early personality, called the "Babe Ruth of stock car racing."

Rusty Wallace, 1989 NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series champion.

Joe Weatherly, two-time NASCAR premier (now Sprint Cup) series champion.

Leonard Wood, former crew chief for Wood Brothers, revolutionized pit stops.

Tom Jensen is the Editor in Chief of SPEED.com, Senior NASCAR Editor at RACER and a contributing Editor for TruckSeries.com. You can follow him online at twitter.com/tomjensen100.