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McCoy shows off arm to scouts after injury

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Short passes, deep passes and everything in between. Colt McCoy hit them all.

The former Texas quarterback showed off his healed right shoulder for NFL scouts for the first time on Wednesday, completing all 46 of his passes in a controlled workout.

"I've been waiting for this day a long time," he said. "I thought I went out there and killed it today."

The All-American won an NCAA record 45 games as a starter at Texas, but was knocked out of last season's BCS championship game against Alabama on the Longhorns' first drive. A hard tackle pinched a nerve and caused his throwing arm to go numb.

He did not need surgery, just time to rest and rehab.

McCoy said he's been patient to make sure he didn't come back from injury too soon. He said he wanted to throw at the NFL combine but didn't on doctor's orders.

His shoulder was declared 100 percent about three weeks ago. On Wednesday, he threw passes to former teammates Jordan Shipley, who also worked out for scouts, former Texas receiver Quan Cosby, who is with the Cincinnati Bengals and former Texas wideout Nate Jones.

"With those guys, it's pitch and catch," McCoy said.

McCoy spent most of his career in the shotgun and the workout simulated taking snaps from under center, dropping back and rolling out. Texas offensive coordinator Greg Davis called the pass routes and rollouts.

"They wanted to see me throw deep off play-action," McCoy said. "I felt like overall today I was really good."

Green Bay Packers coach Mike McCarthy said McCoy answered any questions about his injury.

"I thought he did a very good job," McCarthy said.

McCarthy was in Norman, Okla., on Monday to watch former Sooners quarterback Sam Bradford, who might be the first overall pick. Like McCoy, Bradford had a shoulder injury last season. Bradford completed all but one of his passes in front of the scouts.

"I liked this workout better. I thought Colt was challenged more in his workout as far as the types of throws," McCarthy said. "Sam was very accurate, but Sam's workout was very controlled. He didn't do as much movement."

Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said it would be expected for McCoy to complete all of his passes.

"This is not real football, this is a workout," Carroll said. "His footwork was really good."

Carroll rated McCoy's arm strength, a question mark for some scouts, as "solid."

McCoy passed for 13,253 yards and 112 touchdowns in his career, both school records. He was 45-8 as a starter and was a finalist for the Heisman Trophy as a junior and senior.

He was a redshirt freshman when Vince Young led Texas to the 2005 national championship and guided the Longhorns back to the title game last season, only to get hurt in the opening minutes after throwing two passes. Freshman Garrett Gilbert played the rest of the game in the 37-21 loss to Alabama.

McCoy said he has private workouts scheduled with six teams, identifying only the St. Louis Rams, who hold the top pick and might take McCoy in the later rounds, especially if they pass on Bradford.

McCoy clearly is looking forward to playing again.

"When you have something taken away from you, like we did with the national championship, it makes you work that much harder to be your best," McCoy said. "I can't wait to see where I end up."