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U.N.'s 'Love Boat' Lets Relief Workers Handle Haiti

Welcome to the "Love Boat," a chartered cruise ship where many U.N. relief workers are living while they stay in Haiti's ruined capital of Port au Prince, where most residents are homeless. The U.N. is paying over $10 million to rent a pair of ships, because "you have to be in good shape in order to help the Haitians," a senior U.N. official told Fox News.

The Sea Voyager

The U.N.'s World Food Program is spending $35,000 a day so its Haiti aid workers can live on the cruise ship "Sea Voyager," instead of on the island. "Living conditions are really appalling" in Port au Prince, said a senior U.N. official, explaining why money was being spent on the cruise ship. "It is the least we could do for (our staffers)."

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The Sea Voyager

Only U.N. workers can stay in the lavishly appointed rooms of the Sea Voyager -- struggling Haitian civilians are not allowed. "I think they understand," said a senior U.N. official. "They have gone through the same trauma themselves. They know we are there to provide shelter for them."

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The Sea Voyager

Edmond Mulet, the head of the U.N.'s peacekeeping contingent in Haiti, said allowing U.N. staffers to live on a cruise ship while homeless Haitians starve and struggle in Port au Prince is similar to what occurs when "oxygen masks come down in a falling plane. The first thing you do is put them on yourself."

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The Sea Voyager

U.N. officials said it is important that their staffers be in tip-top shape as they administer aid in Port au Prince. "You have to be in good shape in order to help the Haitians," said Edmond Mulet, head of the U.N.'s peacekeeping contingent in Haiti. Pictured here is the Harbor Lights Lounge aboard the Sea Voyager, one of two ships chartered by the U.N. to house relief workers.

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The Sea Voyager

Pictured here is the Pilot's Point Pub on the Sea Voyager, a small cruise ship chartered by the U.N.'s World Food Program to house some of its aid workers in Haiti. Though the WFP first touted the ship's arrival, online evidence of the lavish liner has since disappeared. But you can still see it here.

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The Sea Voyager

The Rosecliff Dining Room on board the Sea Voyager, a cruise ship chartered by the U.N.'s World Food Program. U.N. staffers refer to the ship as the "Love Boat" -- even in official documents -- but it's only half as big as the other ship they chartered to house relief workers.

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The Ola Esmeralda

A sunny deck on board the Ola Esmeralda, a cruise ship chartered by the U.N. to house aid workers.

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The Ola Esmeralda

A bar aboard the Ola Esmerelda, a ship owned by a company with close ties to the government of Venezuelan strongman Hugo Chavez. The U.N. has chartered two cruise ships for its relief crews and is spending over $10 million to rent the ships.

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The Ola Esmeralda

Another bar aboard the Ola Esmeralda, a cruise ship chartered by the U.N.'s World Food  Program to house its relief workers in Haiti. Money for the ship is going to a company that is closely tied to Hugo Chavez.

Ola Cruises

The Ola Esmeralda

The Ola Esmeralda

Ola Cruises

The Ola Esmeralda

Ola Cruises

U.N.'s 'Love Boat' Lets Relief Workers Handle Haiti

Welcome to the "Love Boat," a chartered cruise ship where many U.N. relief workers are living while they stay in Haiti's ruined capital of Port au Prince, where most residents are homeless. The U.N. is paying over $10 million to rent a pair of ships, because "you have to be in good shape in order to help the Haitians," a senior U.N. official told Fox News.

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