WORLD

Struggle for Haiti Relief

Clogged roads and looting keep millions of dollars in Haiti relief from getting to those who need it most.

First photos from the devastating earthquake.

Haiti Children

Feb. 1: A girl plays with a doll outside a makeshift tent at a refugee camp in Port-au-Prince. 

As many as 200,000 people have fled Port-au-Prince, a city of 2 million, according to the U.S. Agency for International Development. About 609,000 people are homeless in the capital's metropolitan area, and the United Nations estimates that up to 1 million could leave Haiti's destroyed cities for rural areas already struggling with extreme poverty.

AP

Long Lines to Relief

Feb. 1: U.N. peacekeepers, from Nepal, help to organized the lines of earthquake survivors during a food distribution in Petionville, Haiti.

AP

Haiti Orphans

Jan. 27: Children stand in a orphanage being used by U.N. children's agency UNICEF for Haitian children separated from their parents after the Jan. 12 earthquake, in the outskirts of Port-au-Prince.

UNICEF has brought eight children since the quake, the orphanage had 24 before, with five more on the way, a tiny fraction of those in need. 

AP

Haiti Earthquake Kids

Jan. 27: A girl stands in a orphanage used by U.N. children's agency UNICEF to shelter Haitian children separated from parents.

AP

Haiti Orphan

Jan. 27: A girl stands in a orphanage used by U.N. children's agency UNICEF to shelter Haitian children separated from parents.

AP

Nursing Home Victims

Jan. 27: Andre Jean, 80, has her hair combed by her sister Lejeric Harles, 70, at the municipal nursing home in Port-au-Prince.

Private donors and the nursing home director have brought occasional food deliveries, but the patients lying outdoors say they have been hungry since the Jan. 12 quake.

AP

15 Days Under Rubble

Jan. 27: Darlene Etienne, 17, is treated at a French military field hospital after being rescued from a collapsed school building by a French search and rescue team in Port-au-Prince. Etienne was pulled out of the rubble 15 days after an earthquake hit the Caribbean capital. 

Read the article on Darlene's rescue.

AP

Looting

Jan. 27: A man waits as he is briefly detained by Haitian police after allegedly looting in the aftermath of the Jan. 12 earthquake in Port-au-Prince.

AP

Food Distributed

Jan. 27: Two women carry sacks of grain from a food distribution center run by U.S. Army soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division.

AP

Long Lines for Relief

 Jan. 24: People stand in line waiting to receive water and food at an improvised distribution center organized by the United Nations in the Cite Soleil neighborhood in Port-au-Prince. 

Haiti's government has declared an end to searches for living people trapped under debris, and officials are shifting their focus to caring for the thousands of survivors living in makeshift camps.

AP

Mud Cookies for Sale

Jan. 27: A woman makes cookies out of mud to sell in the Cite Soleil neighborhood in Port-au-Prince. Made of dirt, salt and vegetable shortening, the cookies were already one of very few options for the poorest in Haiti even before the devastating Jan. 12 earthquake. 

AP

Hungry for Days

 Jan 24: A girl cries after receiving food in an improvised distribution center organized by the UN as a United Nations peacekeeper from Brazil kneels to talk to children at the Cite Soleil neighborhood in Port- au-Prince.

AP

Children Lost

Jan. 27: Moise Damie poses holding a picture of her son, Samuel Estinphiste, who was killed in the music school building behind her during the Jan. 12 earthquake in Port-au-Prince.

AP

U.S. Army

Jan. 27:  U.S. Army soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division carry an injured man into a traditional Haitian "tap tap" bus in Port-au-Prince. According to witnesses at the scene the man, along with two others, were shot by Haitian police while allegedly looting in a downtown building in the aftermath of the Jan. 12 earthquake. 

AP

Struggle for Haiti Relief

Clogged roads and looting keep millions of dollars in Haiti relief from getting to those who need it most.

First photos from the devastating earthquake.

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