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Coast Guard sinks Japanese ghost ship adrift since tsunami

The U.S. Coast Guard decided to sink the ship dislodged by last year's tsunami because it was a threat to maritime traffic and could have an environmental impact if it grounded.

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April 5, 2012: In this photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, a plume of smoke rises from the derelict Japanese ship Ryou-Un Maru after it was hit by canon fire by a U.S. Coast Guard cutter in the Gulf of Alaska. The Coast Guard decided to sink the ship dislodged by last year's tsunami because it was a threat to maritime traffic and could have an environmental impact if it grounded.  (AP)

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April 5, 2012: In this photo provided by the U.S. Coast Guard, a plume of smoke rises from a derelict Japanese ship after it was hit by canon fire by a U.S. Coast Guard cutter in the Gulf of Alaska. The Coast Guard decided to sink the ship dislodged by last year's tsunami because it was a threat to maritime traffic and could have an environmental impact if it grounded. 

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April 5, 2012: Coast Guard Petty Officer Charly Hengen, aboard a C-130, watches a giant plume of smoke rise from a derelict Japanese ship after it was hit by canon fire by a U.S. Coast Guard cutter in the Gulf of Alaska. The Coast Guard decided to sink the ship dislodged by last year's tsunami because it was a threat to maritime traffic and could have an environmental impact if it grounded.  (AP)

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April 5, 2012: Coast Guard Aviation Maintenance Technicians Sean Thomas of Clearwater, Fla., left, and Bob Chaney of Irvine, Ky., deploy a buoy from a C-130 cargo plane to monitor possible pollution from a derelict Japanese ship, which the Coast Guard attempted to sink in the Gulf of Alaska. A Coast Guard cutter shot canon fire to sink the Japanese shrimping boat, which was dislodged by last year's tsunami, because it was a threat to maritime traffic and could have an environmental impact if it grounded.  (AP)

Coast Guard sinks Japanese ghost ship adrift since tsunami

The U.S. Coast Guard decided to sink the ship dislodged by last year's tsunami because it was a threat to maritime traffic and could have an environmental impact if it grounded.

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