TERROR

Gitmo Grads

The Pentagon's latest estimate says roughly 20 percent of the 560 detainees released from the Guantanamo Bay Detention Center are believed to have returned to the terror front lines — a nearly 50 percent increase from the Pentagon's April estimate of 14 percent and nearly double the 11 percent estimate issued in January of 2009.

Abu al-Hareth Muhammad al-Oufi

Abu al-Hareth Muhammad al-Oufi, also known as Mohamed Atiq Awayd Al Harbi and Mazin Salih Musaid al-Alawi al-Awfi, was once held in U.S. custody in Guantanamo Bay and released in Nov. 2007. This image taken from a video released Jan. 23, 2009 by al-Malahim Media Foundation, the media arm of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), shows a man IntelCenter identifies as al-Oufi, then a senior leader in AQAP. He later surrendered in Yemen and was handed over to the Saudis.

AP

Abdullah Mehsud

Abdullah Mehsud went to Guantanamo without one leg from about the knee down after he allegedly masterminded the kidnapping of two Chinese engineers. The detention center fitted him with a prosthetic leg that reportedly cost the the U.S. taxpayers between $50,000 and $75,000.

This price was nowhere near what Mehsud, a.k.a. Said Mohammed Alim Shah, cost the Pakistani people in April 2007.  After his release, Pakistani officials said he directed a homicide attack that killed 31 people. Two months later, he blew himself up to avoid capture by Pakistani forces.

AP

Abdul Rahman Abdallah Noor

Noor was released from Guantanamo in July 2003 and has since participated in fighting against U.S. forces near Kandahar, according to the Department of Defense. In Oct. 7, 2001, Noor was identified in a video interview with al-Jazeerah TV network, wherein he is identified as the “deputy defense minister of the Taliban.”

www.wikipedia.org/U.S. Department of Defense

Abdallah Ali al-Ajmi

Abdallah Ali al-Ajmi was released from Guantanamo and transferred back to his home country, Kuwait, in 2005. Last April, he blew himself up in a homicide attack that killed 12 people in Mosul, Iraq. Al-Ajmi, known in Guantanamo as Detainee 220, made his martyrdom tape before the attack, in which he said, ""I thank Allah, Lord of the Worlds, who freed me from Guantanamo prison and, after we were tortured, connected me with the Islamic State of Iraq [ISI]. And it is the gift of Allah to follow the path of this nation, the ISI."

FNC

Ruslan Odizhev

Ruslan Odizhev, a former Guantanamo detainee, was repatriated to Russia in March 2004. After his release, Russian authorities stated Odizhev participated in several terrorist acts including an October 2005 attack in the Caucasus region that killed and injured several police officers. He was killed June 27, 2007 in a shootout with security agents in Kabardino-Balkariya, a region near Chechnya that is plagued by violence linked to both crime and religious tensions, Russia's top security agency said.

AP

Mohammed Nayim Farouq

Mohammed Nayim Farouq was repatriated to Afghanistan in July 2003. According to the Department of Defense, he quickly renewed his association with Taliban and Al Qaeda members and has since become re-involved in anti-coalition militant activity.

Mehdi Muhammed Ghezali

Swedish national Mehdi-Muhammed Ghezalin was released from Guantanamo in July 2004. On September 14, 2009, Pakistani police said they detained Ghezali and others in his group as they allegedly tried to join Al Qaeda in the country's tribal areas.

AP

Abu Sufyan al-Azdi al-Shahri

Abu Sufyan al-Azdi al-Shihri was repatriated to Saudi Arabia in November 2007. He is now the deputy of the newly-established Al Qaeda in Arabian Peninsula.

SITE Intelligence Group

Gitmo Grads

The Pentagon's latest estimate says roughly 20 percent of the 560 detainees released from the Guantanamo Bay Detention Center are believed to have returned to the terror front lines — a nearly 50 percent increase from the Pentagon's April estimate of 14 percent and nearly double the 11 percent estimate issued in January of 2009.

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