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NASA to Send Robot Astronaut Into Space

NASA's humans-in-space program may be may be suffering with the demise of the space shuttle program, but the space agency's robots-in-space program is alive and well. Meet Robonaut 2.

Face Off

Robonaut2 will fly to the International Space Station aboard Discovery on the space shuttle's final planned mission, STS-133.

NASA/JSC Robert Markowitz

Robonauts With Tools

NASA and General Motors have come together to develop the next generation dexterous humanoid robot. The robots – called Robonaut2 – were designed to use the same tools as humans, which allows them to work safely side-by-side humans on Earth and in space.

NASA/JSC

Robonaut Strikes a Pose

Robonaut2 – or R2 for short – is the next generation dexterous robot, developed through a Space Act Agreement by NASA and General Motors. Its human-like shape was a product of the fact that it was built to work side-by-side with people, assisting with work that it is difficult or dangerous on Earth and in space.

NASA/JSC

Packing Up

The Robonaut2 crew pack up. This is a front side view of SLEEPR, the shipping container that will protect the robot during launch.

NASA

Dress to Impress

Robonaut2 gets a new flight suit.

NASA

Two Thumbs Up

Robonaut2 is up and running.

NASA

Robot Twins

Robonaut2 unit A looks on as Robonaut2 unit B is resting comfortably in SLEEPR in Space Shuttle Discovery on the launch pad, preparing to launch.

NASA

Robotweets

With the help of its team, Robonaut2 sent its first tweet this past summer. Check out his twitter page @AstroRobonaut

NASA

Team Robonaut

Everyone that worked on the ISS Robonaut project.

Robert Markowitz and Bill Stafford

Roboscout

Robonaut2 performs a Cub Scout Salute. This photo was displayed at the Boy Scout Jamboree in 2010.

NASA / Joe Bibby

Robonaut, With a Friend

Chris Ihrke, senior project engineer for General Motors, works with the new dexterous humanoid robot developed by NASA and General Motors at Johnson Space Center.

NASA/JSC

Robonaut Works Well With Others

Chris Ihrke, senior project engineer for General Motors, works with the new dexterous humanoid robot developed by NASA and General Motors at Johnson Space Center.

NASA/JSC

Robonaut Works Well With Others

Chris Ihrke, senior project engineer for General Motors, works with the new dexterous humanoid robot developed by NASA and General Motors at Johnson Space Center.

NASA/JSC

Robonaut Lifts Weights

Robonaut2 surpasses previous dexterous humanoid robots in strength, yet it is safe enough to work side-by-side with humans. It is able to lift, not just hold, this 20-pound weight (about four times heavier than what other dexterous robots can handle) both near and away from its body.

NASA/JSC

Robonaut Gets a Workout

Robonaut2 surpasses previous dexterous humanoid robots in strength, yet it is safe enough to work side-by-side with humans. It is able to lift, not just hold, this 20-pound weight (about four times heavier than what other dexterous robots can handle) both near and away from its body.

NASA/JSC

Robonaut

Robonaut2 – or R2 for short – is the next generation dexterous robot, developed through a Space Act Agreement by NASA and General Motors.

NASA

First-Gen Robonaut B

The earlier-generation Robonaut B's upper body can attach to a Segway-built robotic mobility platform (RMP) in order to drive on Earth.

NASA/JSC

Robonaut B

Robonaut B's upper body can attach to a Segway-built robotic mobility platform (RMP) in order to drive on Earth.
NASA/JSC

Robonaut B Gets Wheels

A fusion between Robonaut and a four or six-wheeled rover could one day explore and work the surface of Mars or the moon.

NASA

Robonaut B Gets a Leg Up

Robonaut B uses a "space leg" to secure itself to a mockup of the International Space Station. The leg apparatus allows Robonaut the freedom to use station handrails to reach a work site, then anchor itself during a spacewalk.

NASA/JSC

NASA to Send Robot Astronaut Into Space

NASA's humans-in-space program may be may be suffering with the demise of the space shuttle program, but the space agency's robots-in-space program is alive and well. Meet Robonaut 2.

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