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Stunning Light Show Illuminates Iceland Volcano's Eruption

Beneath a stunning sky courtesy of the Northern Lights, Iceland's erupting volcano continues to belch smoke and lava. 

Northern Lights Over Iceland

The Northern Lights are seen above the ash plume of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano in the evening April 22, 2010.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Northern Lights Over Iceland

The Northern Lights are seen above the ash plume of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano April 23, 2010. Iceland's volcanic eruption was spewing far less ash on Thursday and the plume of smoke was low, but a change of wind direction meant the north Atlantic island's main airports were now set to close for the first time.

REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

Northern Lights Over Iceland

A tourist walks away after looking at Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano April 22, 2010. Iceland's volcanic eruption was spewing far less ash on Thursday and the plume of smoke was low, but a change of wind direction meant the north Atlantic island's main airports were now set to close for the first time.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Northern Lights Over Iceland

The Northern Lights are seen above the ash plume of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano in the evening April 22, 2010.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Northern Lights Over Iceland

The Northern Lights are seen above the ash plume of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano in the evening April 22, 2010.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Northern Lights Over Iceland

The Northern Lights are seen through a valley leading away from Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano April 22, 2010.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Northern Lights Over Iceland

The Northern Lights are seen above the ash plume of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano in the evening April 22, 2010.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Northern Lights Over Iceland

The Northern Lights are seen over Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano April 23, 2010. Iceland's volcanic eruption was spewing far less ash on Thursday and the plume of smoke was low, but a change of wind direction meant the north Atlantic island's main airports were now set to close for the first time.

REUTERS/Ingolfur Juliusson

Northern Lights Over Iceland

The Northern Lights are seen above the ash plume of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano in the evening April 22, 2010.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Rumbling Continues

April 21: Activity is seen from the volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier. Geologists continued to keep a close watch on the Iceland volcano Eyjafjallajokull on Wednesday, as observers noticed a change in the eruption pattern. Instead of thick black smoke, the plume was almost white... and more like steam than black ash.

AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti

The Cleanup Begins

April 22: A road crew moves loads of wet volcanic ask as they repair damaged roads, south of the Eyjafjallajokull glacier near Hvolsvollur, Iceland. A volcano erupted beneath Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier covering the region with volcanic ash and causing flooding.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Still Going

April 21: Seen from near Hvolsvollur, Iceland, a plume of ash, dust and steam from a volcano erupting beneath Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier towers into the sky.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

More Activity at Glacier

April 21: Activity is seen from the volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier. Geologists continued to keep a close watch on the Iceland volcano Eyjafjallajokull on Wednesday, as observers noticed a change in the eruption pattern. Instead of thick black smoke, the plume was almost white... and more like steam than black ash.

AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti

Rumbling Continues

April 21: Activity is seen from the volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier. Geologists continued to keep a close watch on the Iceland volcano Eyjafjallajokull on Wednesday, as observers noticed a change in the eruption pattern. Instead of thick black smoke, the plume was almost white... and more like steam than black ash.

AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti

Volcanic Lightning

April 17: Lightning streaks across the sky as lava flows from a volcano in Eyjafjallajokul. The Icelandic volcano is spewing ash into the air and wreaking havoc on flights across Europe -- and could continue to erupt for days or even months to come, officials said. 

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Ash Clouds Rolling In

April 19: An ash cloud grows from the volcano in Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier. Volcanic ash drifting across the Atlantic forced the cancellation of flights in Britain and disrupted air traffic across northern Europe, stranding thousands of passengers. Flights in and out of London Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, were halted. Shutdowns and cancellations spread to France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden, Finland and Switzerland.

AP Photo/Jon Gustafsson

Ash Plume

April 19: A plume of ash rises from the volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier. Scientists say because this volcano is located below a glacial ice cap, magma is being cooled quickly, causing explosions and plumes of grit that can be catastrophic to plane engines, depending on prevailing winds.

AP Photo/Jon Gustafsson

Clouds of Ash

April 19: Ash rises from the volcano in Eyjafjallajokull glacier. Scientists in Iceland offered some hope that conditions might be easing, saying the new volcanic ash plume is lower, which would pose less of a threat to commercial aircraft in the future.

AP Photo/Jon Gustafsson

Clouds of Ash

April 19: A plume of ash continues to rise from the volcano under Eyjafjallajokull glacier.

AP Photo/Jon Gustafsson

National Geographic on the Scene

April 18: A film crew working for National Geographic set-up on Eyjafjallajokull glacier after landing on the glacier close to the volcanic eruption.

AP Photo/Reynir Petursson, Helicopter.is

National Geographic on the Scene

April 18: A film crew working for National Geographic close to the volcanic eruption.

AP Photo/Reynir Petursson, Helicopter.is

Fire and Ice

"After sunset is the best time of day to photograph volcanos," writes an Icelandic photographer who captured some stunning images of the eruption. "I have narrowed it down to a 15-minute time frame that renders the best light both for the flying magma and the fore/background. Here we can see the volcano and Tindfjallajökull glacier which is also is a volcano but has not erupted in thousands of years."

Orvatli / Flickr

Smoke from Volcano

April 15: Smoke and steam hangs over the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, early Thursday, which has erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Volcanic ash drifting across the Atlantic forced the cancellation of flights in Britain and disrupted air traffic across northern Europe, stranding thousands of passengers. 

AP Photo/Brynjar Gaudi

Lava River

"The eruption is technically not in the Eyjafjallajökull Glacier but between it and the next glacier, Mýrdalsjökull," writes an Icelandic photographer who captured some stunning images of the volcanic eruption in Eyjafjallajökull glacier. "Mýrdalsjökull glacier is Eyjafjallajökull glacier's bigger brother, both in terms of size of the glacier and also in terms of capability and size of its eruptions. Under the bigger brother lies the powerful and dangerous Katla caldera. It erupts every 60-80 years."

Orvatli / Wikipedia

Volcanic Ash Seen by Satellite

April 15: A cloud of volcanic ash is seen spreading from the southern side of Iceland (top L) in this handout satellite photograph taken at 0915GMT on Thursday and received from Norway's Met Office in London. A huge ash cloud from an Icelandic volcano turned the skies of northern Europe into a no-fly zone on Thursday, stranding hundreds of thousands of passengers. The coastlines were superimposed on the photograph by the Met Office.

REUTERS/Norwegian Met Office/Handout

Smoke from Volcano

April 14: In this image taken by the Icelandic Coastguard Wednesday, smoke and steam rises from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet. Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.

AP Photo/Icelandic Coastguard, ho

Volcanic Ash Seen by Satellite

April 15: The European Space Agency's Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) shows the vast cloud of volcanic ash sweeping across the UK from the eruption in Iceland, more than 1,000 km away. The ash, which can be seen as the large grey streak in the image, is drifting from west to east at a height of about 11 km above the surface Earth.

ESA

Smoke from Eyjafjallajokull

April 14: Smoke and steam hangs over the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, Wednesday, which has erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Volcanic ash drifting across the Atlantic forced the cancellation of flights in Britain and disrupted air traffic across northern Europe, stranding thousands of passengers.

AP Photo/Jon Gustafsson

A Rock is Born

"This is earth in its making," writes an Icelandic photographer who captured some stunning photographs of the Eyjafjallajökull Eruption. He explained that the edge of the lava flow moved very slowly outward from the main lava flow. "Because it moved so slowly I could get very close to its hot edge. On its edge it was very interesting to see rocks being formed as they broke from higher and rolled down onto the snow."

Orvatli / Flickr

Steam Pump

The lava from the eruption flows into two steep and deep canyons, Hrunagil and Hvannárgil, writes an Icelandic photographer who took some stunning photographs of the eruption in Iceland. Here lava is flowing into the longer Hvannárgil just an hour after it going down the canyon. 

"The upper part of the canyon was filled with deep snow and ice. When the 1000°C hot lava mass and the snow/ice come into contact huge clouds of steam are formed."

Orvatli / Flickr

From a Distance

"The eruption seems to be escalating with lava now flowing into the beautiful and rugged Þórmörk," writes an Icelandic photographer who captured some stunning images of the volcanic eruption." "The road I went yesterday is now closed so getting any closer than this is now very hard without some serious hiking (and probably very stormy too)."

Orvatli / Flickr

Too Close to Eruption?

"YES! I got close to the eruption," writes an Icelandic photographer who captured some stunning pictures of the eruption. "It was the most awesome experience I have had years. The size of it (even if it is a very small eruption), the loud noise, the explosions, the heat, the smell, the melting glaciers, the 100m high lava-fall, the location itself made this an experience I will never forget. Being this close to nature in all its force is... well I can't describe it in words, it was a little surreal."

Orvatli / Flickr

Smoke from Volcano

April 14: In this image taken by the Icelandic Coastguard, smoke and steam rises from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet. Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.

AP Photo/Icelandic Coastguard, ho

Smoking Volcano

April 14: In this image taken from TV Wednesday, smoke rises from the crater of the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet. 

AP Photo/CH2 TV, via APTN

Smoking Volcano

April 14: In this image by the Icelandic Coastguard, smoke and steam rises from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet. Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.

AP Photo/Icelandic Coastguard, ho

Water from Volcano

April 14: In this image made available by the Icelandic Coastguard, water flows from the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, which erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet. 

AP Photo/Icelandic Coastguard, ho

Volcano Causes Flooding

In this image made available by the Icelandic Coastguard, taken Wednesday April 14, 2010, floodwaters rising after the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Authorities evacuated 800 residents from around the glacier as rivers rose by up to 10 feet (3 meters). Emergency officials and scientists said the eruption under the ice cap was 10 to 20 times more powerful than one last month, and carried a much greater risk of widespread flooding.
AP Photo/Icelandic Coastguard, ho

Volcano in Iceland

March 21: Molten lava vents from a rupture near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, as a volcano erupts early in the morning. Hundreds of people have been evacuated from a small village in southern Iceland after the volcanic eruption shot ash and molten lava into the air, the first major eruption here in nearly 200 years.

AP Photo/Ragnar Axelsson

Volcano in Iceland

March 21: This frame grab from APTN shows the volcano near the Eyjafjallajoekull glacier, the fifth largest glacier in Iceland, as it begins erupting early Sunday morning. Fearing flooding from the glacier melt, authorities evacuated some 400 people in the area 100 miles southeast of the capital, Reykjavik, as a precaution but no damage or injuries have been reported according to authorities. The last time the volcano erupted was in the 1820s.

AP Photo/APTN

Eyjafjallajokull Glacier

A photograph from Wikipedia shows the beauty of Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, prior to the volcanic eruption.

Andreas Tille / Wikipedia

Eyjafjallajokull Glacier

A photograph from Wikipedia shows the beauty of Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, prior to the volcanic eruption.

TommyBee / Wikipedia

Volcano in Iceland

March 21: Seen in this aerial photo, molten lava vents from a rupture near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, as a volcano erupts early Sunday. Some hundreds of people have been evacuated from a small village in southern Iceland on Sunday after the volcanic eruption shot ash and molten lava into the air, the first major eruption here in nearly 200 years.

AP Photo/Ragnar Axelsson

Volcano in Iceland

March 21: Molten lava vents from a rupture near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, as a volcano erupts early Sunday, seen in this aerial photo. Hundreds of people have been evacuated from a small village in southern Iceland on Sunday after the eruption shot ash and molten lava into the air, the first major eruption here in nearly 200 years.

AP Photo/Ragnar Axelsson

Volcano in Iceland

March 21: In this aerial photo, showing molten lava as it vents from a rupture near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, as a volcano erupts early Sunday. Some hundreds of people have been evacuated from a small nearby village in southern Iceland on Sunday after a volcanic eruption which shot ash and molten lava into the air, the first major eruption here in nearly 200 years.

AP Photo/Ragnar Axelsson

Northern Lights Over Iceland.10.jpg

The Northern Lights are seen above the ash plume of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano in the evening April 22, 2010. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (ICELAND - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)

Stunning Light Show Illuminates Iceland Volcano's Eruption

Beneath a stunning sky courtesy of the Northern Lights, Iceland's erupting volcano continues to belch smoke and lava. 

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