ARCHAEOLOGY

Hobbit Fossils Found?

Ancestors of a hobbit-like species of humans may have colonized the Indonesian island of Flores as far back as a million years ago, much earlier than thought.

Homo Floresiensis Skull

A researcher holds a skull of a Homo floresiensis in Indonesia. This world turned upside down may once have existed on the remote island of Flores, where an international team is trying to shed light on the fossilized 18,000-year-old skeleton of a dwarf cavewoman whose discovery in 2003 was an international sensation.

AP Photo/Puslitbang Arkenas

Bones Found Near Hobbit

An archaeologist examines pieces of animal bones found at the Liang Bua cave excavation site where the remains of Homo floresiensis were discovered in Ruteng, Flores island, Indonesia. This world turned upside down may once have existed on the remote island of Flores, where an international team is trying to shed light on the fossilized 18,000-year-old skeleton of a dwarf cavewoman whose discovery in 2003 was an international sensation.

AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim

Indonesian Hobbit

This artist's rendering created by Peter Schouten shows a dwarf Homo floresiensis that lived on the remote island of Flores in Indonesia between 17,000 and 100,000 years ago.

AP Photo/National Geographic Society

Homo Floresiensis Skeleton

A skeleton of Homo floresiensis that was discovered in Liang Bua cave in Ruteng, Flores island, Indonesia. An international team is trying to shed light on the fossilized 18,000-year-old skeleton whose discovery in 2003 was an international sensation.

AP Photo/Department of Anatomical Sciences of Stony Brook University Medical Center, William Jungers

Descendant of the Hobbit?

80-year-old and four-feet-tall Victor Jehabut, who is often claimed by tour guides as a descendant of Homo floresiensis, dwarf cave-dwellers that roamed Flores island 160,000 years ago, walks in his village in Rampasasa, Indonesia. Jehabut said the rumors of him being related to the hobbits are not true, and that childhood hardship had stunted his growth.

AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim

The Search for Hobbits

An Indonesian archaeologist examines a stone spall at Liang Bua cave excavation site where the remains of Homo floresiensis were discovered in Ruteng, Flores island, Indonesia.

AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim

Digging up the Hobbit

Workers labor at the Liang Bua cave excavation site where the remains of Homo floresiensis were discovered in Ruteng, Flores island of Indonesia. This world turned upside down may once have existed on the remote island, where an international team is trying to shed light on the fossilized 18,000-year-old skeleton of a dwarf cavewoman whose discovery in 2003 was an international sensation.

AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim

Digging up the Hobbit

Australian archaeologist Mike Morwood works at the Liang Bua cave excavation site where the remains of Homo floresiensis were discovered in Ruteng, Flores island, Indonesia.

AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim

Digging up the Hobbit

Workers labor at the Liang Bua cave excavation site where the remains of Homo floresiensis were discovered in Ruteng, Flores island of Indonesia.

AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim

Digging up the Hobbit

An Indonesian archaeologist works at the Liang Bua cave excavation site where the remains of Homo floresiensis were discovered in Ruteng, Flores island, Indonesia.
AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim

Hobbit Fossils Found?

Ancestors of a hobbit-like species of humans may have colonized the Indonesian island of Flores as far back as a million years ago, much earlier than thought.

More From Our Sponsors