WILD NATURE

Coming Soon to a Swamp Near You

A U.S. Geological Survey report released Tuesday analyzes Burmese pythons, northern and southern African pythons, boa constrictors and yellow anacondas and assesses the giant snakes are of "high risk" to the ecosystems of the U.S. 

Python Problem

July 25: Justin Matthews of Matthews Wildlife Rescue holding the head of a Burmese python which he pulled from a drainage pipe in Bradenton, Fla.

Scientists think some Burmese pythons may have escaped in 1992 from pet shops battered by Hurricane Andrew and have been reproducing ever since.

Between Jan. 1 and Oct. 5, some 270 Burmese pythons have been removed from Florida's  Everglades National Park.

A U.S. Geological Survey report released Tuesday assesses snakes, like the Burmese python pictured, could slither their way north from the warm, humid conditions of South Florida.

The big snake threatens native species and ecosystems because they mature and reproduce quickly, travel long distances and can eat almost anything in fur, feathers or scales, experts say.

AP2009

Python Problems

July 17: A Burmese python is seen captured in the Everglades.

The number of Burmese pythons in South Florida and throughout Everglades National Park has exploded in the past decade to potentially thousands, though wildlife officials aren't sure exactly how many are slithering around the region.

Between Jan. 1 and Oct. 5, some 270 Burmese pythons have been removed from Florida's  Everglades National Park.

A U.S. Geological Survey report released Tuesday assesses snakes, like the Burmese python pictured, could slither their way north from the warm, humid conditions of South Florida.

The big snake threatens native species and ecosystems because they mature and reproduce quickly, travel long distances and can eat almost anything in fur, feathers or scales, experts say.

AP Photo/Sun Sentinel, Mike Stocker

Python Problem

 July 17: A 9 -1/2-foot long Burmese python that was captured in the Everglades.

Pythons kill by wrapping themselves around prey and constricting. The snakes, which aren't natives of Florida, can grow to as long as 25 feet. 

A U.S. Geological Survey report released Tuesday assesses snakes, like the one pictured, could slither their way north from the warm, humid conditions of South Florida.

The big snakes threaten native species and ecosystems because they mature and reproduce quickly, travel long distances and can eat almost anything in fur, feathers or scales, experts say.

AP2009

Python Problem

Aug. 24: Photo released by the Florida Museum of Natural History, shows Burmese pythons, left, and an African rock python, center, that were removed from the Florida Everglades.

A juvenile African rock python, right, from its native range is seen coiled on a tray at the Florida Museum of Natural History laboratory at the University of Florida.

Scientists fear the African python will begin breeding with the Burmese snakes, creating a new population. While similar in size, the African rock python is known to be a bit more aggressive than the Burmese species.

Florida Museum of Natural History

Alligator vs. Python

File photo of an American alligator and a Burmese python locked in a struggle to prevail in Everglades National Park. Scientists say the snake apparently tried to swallow the gator whole -- and then exploded.

The incident alerted biologists to new potential dangers from Burmese pythons in the Everglades, since not only can the python kill other reptiles, the snakes will also eat otters, squirrels, endangered woodstorks and sparrows.

 

AP

Burmese python

Houdin, a 12-foot adult Burmese python, in a 2006 file photo.

A U.S. Geological Survey report released Tuesday assesses that snakes, like the one pictured, could slither their way north from the warm, humid conditions of South Florida.

The big snakes threaten native species and ecosystems because they mature and reproduce quickly, travel long distances and can eat almost anything in fur, feathers or scales, experts say.

The report analyzed nine kinds of snakes. Five—Burmese pythons, northern and southern African pythons, boa constrictors and yellow anacondas—are of "high risk" to the ecosystems of the U.S., especially in Florida.

AP

Baby Burmese

A Burmese python hatchling held in a human hand in a 2005 file photo.

A reproducing snake can have as many as 100 hatchlings, which explains why the snake population has soared.

Florida scientists report the rising population may be attributed to people buying pets they are not prepared to care for, and then setting them free into the Everglades.

AP

Python Problem

Oct. 1: A diamond python inspects a hand at Sydney Wildlife World in Sydney, Australia.

A U.S. Geological Survey report released Tuesday assesses snakes, like the one pictured, could slither their way north from the warm, humid conditions of South Florida.

The big snakes threaten native species and ecosystems because they mature and reproduce quickly, travel long distances and can eat almost anything in fur, feathers or scales, experts say.

The report analyzed nine kinds of snakes. Five—Burmese pythons, northern and southern African pythons, boa constrictors and yellow anacondas—are of "high risk" to the ecosystems of the U.S., especially in Florida.

AP2009

Python Problems

A 16-year old snake measures 18' long and 30" around. Three of these enormous constrictors that can grow to 20 feet and weigh 200 pounds have been found in the last few months in western Miami-Dade County, raising concerns that they could establish a breeding population, just like their Burmese cousins.

AP

Python Problems

A 16-year old snake measures 18' long and 30" around. Three of these enormous constrictors that can grow to 20 feet and weigh 200 pounds have been found in the last few months in western Miami-Dade County, raising concerns that they could establish a breeding population, just like their Burmese cousins.

AP

Coming Soon to a Swamp Near You

A U.S. Geological Survey report released Tuesday analyzes Burmese pythons, northern and southern African pythons, boa constrictors and yellow anacondas and assesses the giant snakes are of "high risk" to the ecosystems of the U.S. 

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