Digestifs of the World

Stop your bellyaching with some of these disgestifs, sipped the world over.

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Eaux-de-vie, which is a type of colorless fruit brandy favored in France, takes distilled, fermented fruit (pears, oranges, lemons) and creates a potent digestif. Drink it either from a tulip-shaped glass or snifter. 

 

Guillaume Paumier

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Crème de cacao is another digestif favored in France, but unlike the cognacs and various eaux-de-vie, this hits the sweeter side of the palette.

Torani

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In France, the full-flavored Armagnac is a post-dinner favorite. Produced in the Armagnac region in southwest France it is distilled from wine usually made from a blend of Armagnac grapes and aged in oak barrels.

Croix de Salles

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In Italy, Sicilians favor Averna – a sweet version of Amaro that has enough sugary sweet punch to satisfy even the most die-hard dessert eater. It's produced by macerating herbs, roots, flowers, bark, and/or citrus peels in alcohol and aging it in casks or in a bottle.

Averna

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Germany has Jagermeister, a digestif tradition that mirrors the Italians in its reliance on herbs and botanicals. Its ingredients include 56 herbs, fruits, roots and spices including citrus peel, licorice, anise, poppy seeds, saffron, ginger, juniper berries and ginseng, mixed with sugar, caramel, alcohol and water.

Jagermeister

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In the U.S., the approach to after dinner drinks tends toward the decidedly sweet, with digestifs like Baileys Irish Cream either sipped alone or mixed in a mug of hot coffee. 

Baileys Irish Cream

Digestifs of the World

Stop your bellyaching with some of these disgestifs, sipped the world over.

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