ARCHAEOLOGY

Amelia Earhart's fate reconstructed

A variety of fragmented objects collected by archaeologists at a site on the uninhabited island of Nikumaroro, a tiny desert island between Australia and Hawaii, may have originally been American beauty and skin care products, all dating to the 1930s, and belonging to the lost aviatrix.

Amelia Earhart beauty.jpg

A variety of fragmented objects collected by archaeologists at a site on the uninhabited island may have originally been American beauty and skin care products, all dating to the 1930s.
TIGHAR

Amelia Earhart Campana bottle.jpg

The bottom of a 3-ounce clear glass bottle. The embossed code and chemical analysis of contents matches "Campana Italian Balm," a popular 1930's skin softener for women.
TIGHAR

Amelia Earhart ointmentpot.jpg

A broken glass "ointment pot" jar that matches a period brand: Dr. C.H. Berry's Freckle Ointment, billed to "positively cure freckles, tan, and all blemishes and discolorations of the skin." Earhart is known to have been concerned about her freckles.
TIGHAR

earhart.jpg

Earhart's plane went down in 1937 and her disappearance has been a mystery ever since.
AP

Amelia Earhart Bevington Full 2012.jpg

The so-called Bevington photo, taken by an officer in the British foreign service in the area just 3 months after Earhart disappeared.
TIGHAR

Earhart Island nikumaroro.jpg

Nikumaroro (formerly Gardner Island) looking southeastward at low tide. Note the broad, dry reef-flat which surrounds the atoll. The rusting remains of the steamer S.S. Norwich City can be seen on the reef edge at right center. This photo was taken in 1978.
TIGHAR / Geomarix

Amelia Earhart SearchArea.jpg

The full search area in the deep waters off Nikumaroro, a tiny desert island between Australia and Hawaii where the legendary aviator may have landed 75 years ago.
TIGHAR / GeoEye

Amelia Earhart knife.jpg

An "Easy Open" double-bladed, bone handled jack knife, from the Imperial Cutlery Company, of Providence, R.I. Found on the island, broken, with blades missing -- and similar to a knife inventoried aboard Earhart Electra.

TIGHAR

Amelia Earhart greenbottle.jpg

A broken greeen glass bottle, with the bottom melted off. It matches a 3-ounce bottle of "St. Joseph Never and Bone Family Liniment," a design patented in 1933.
TIGHAR

Amelia Earhart Plexiglass.jpg

A piece of Plexiglass found on the island, possibly a windscreen from Earhart's plane.
TIGHAR

AmeliaEarhart.jpg

FILE - In this undated photo, Amelia Earhart, the first woman to cross the Atlantic Ocean by plane sits on top of a plane.
AP

Earhart model 10 Electra.jpg

March 21, 2012: A model of the Lockheed Model 10 Electra that Amelia Earhart was flying during an attempt to make a flight around the world in 1937, seen in Atchison, Kan.
AP Photo/The St. Joseph News-Press, Eric Keith

Earhart model 10 Electra finishes flight.jpg

May 28, 1997: A vintage Lockheed Electra aircraft piloted by Linda Finch lands in Oakland, Calif., successfully completing the around-the-world flight Amelia Earhart started but never finished.
REUTERS/David Ake

Earhart personal photo goggles.jpg

Sept. 9, 2011: An original, unpublished personal photo of Amelia Earhart dated 1937, along with goggles she was wearing during her first plane crash are seen at Clars Auction Gallery in Oakland, Calif. Another set of her goggles sold several years ago for more than $100,000.
AP Photo/Ben Margot

Earhart log cabin.jpg

June 26, 2012: The remains of an incomplete log cabin that was intended for Ameila Earhart near the ghost town of Kirwin, Wyo. in the Shoshone National Forest. Carl Dunrud was building the cabin for Earhart when she disappeared over the Pacific.
AP Photo / Alan Rogers, Star-Tribune

Earhart log cabin 2.jpg

June 26, 2012: Jim Dunrud stands inside the walls of an incomplete cabin that had been intended for Amelia Earhart. Jim's father, Carl Dunrud, was building the cabin for her.
AP Photo / Alan Rogers, Star-Tribune

Amelia Earhart's fate reconstructed

A variety of fragmented objects collected by archaeologists at a site on the uninhabited island of Nikumaroro, a tiny desert island between Australia and Hawaii, may have originally been American beauty and skin care products, all dating to the 1930s, and belonging to the lost aviatrix.

More From Our Sponsors