SCIENCE

New images of sunken Titanic released

New images from the April 2012 edition of National Geographic magazine show the complete wreck of the Titanic for the first time ever. The luxury passenger liner sank 100 years ago after striking an iceberg on its maiden voyage, killing 1,517 people. All images copyright 2012 RMS Titanic, Inc; produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

ethereal-view-titanic-bow

Etheral views of Titanic's bow (modeled) offer a comprehensiveness of detail never seen before. The optical mosaics each consist of 1,500 high-resolution images rectified using sonar data.
Copyright 2012 RMS Titanic, Inc; produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Modeling by Stefan Fichtel.

titanic mangled stern

With her rudder cleaving the sand and two propeller blades peeking from the murk, Titanic's mangled stern rests on the abyssal plain, 1,970 feet south of the more photographed bow. This optical mosaic combines 300 high-resolution images taken on a 2010 expedition.
Copyright 2012 RMS Titanic, Inc.; produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

titanic battered stern overhead

Titanic's battered stern is captured overhead here. Making sense of this tangle of metal presents endless challenges to experts. Says one, "If you're going to interpret this stuff, you gotta love Picasso."
Copyright 2012 RMS Titanic, Inc.; produced by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

First-complete-view-of-Titanic-wreck

Ethereal views of Titanic's bow offer a comprehensiveness of detail never seen before. The optical mosaics each consist of 1,500 high-resolution images rectified using sonar data.
Copyright 2012 RMS Titanic, Inc.; produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

titanic-singled-ended-boiler

Five 57-ton boilers rolled out of boiler room 1 like giant marbles when the hull split in two. The smallest on board, they were used to heat and light the ship when in port.
Copyright 2012 RMS Titanic, Inc; produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

iPad cover national geographic titanic.jpg

The cover of the April, 2012, issue of the National Geographic's iPad edition, which features a wealth of never before seen images of the wreck of the Titanic.
National Geographic

Titanic sails AP file

April 10, 1912: The Luxury liner Titanic departs Southampton, England, for her maiden Atlantic Ocean voyage to New York.
AP1912

Full Titanic wreck site mapped AP

This composite image, released by RMS Titanic Inc., and made from sonar and more than 100,000 photos taken in 2010 from by unmanned, underwater robots, shows a small portion of a comprehensive map of the 3-by-5-mile debris field surrounding the stern of the Titanic on the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean. The luxury passenger liner sank about 375 miles south of Newfoundland, Canada, after striking an iceberg on its maiden voyage from England to New York on April 15, 1912, killing more than 1,500 people. (AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.)
AP2011

composite image Titanic wreck site

This composite image, released by RMS Titanic Inc., and made from sonar and more than 100,000 photos taken in 2010 from by unmanned, underwater robots, shows a small portion of a comprehensive map of the 3-by-5-mile debris field surrounding the bow of the Titanic on the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean. The luxury passenger liner sank about 375 miles south of Newfoundland, Canada, after striking an iceberg on its maiden voyage from England to New York on April 15, 1912, killing more than 1,500 people. (AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.)
AP2011

Editors finish map of Titanic wreck AP

Kirk Wolfinger, top left, Rushmore DeNooyer, and Tony Bacon of the Lone Wolf Documentary Group, pose at an editing station Thursday, March 8, 2010, in South Portland, Maine. The editors are putting the final touches on a History Channel documentary about the mapping of the 3-by-5-mile debris field of the Titanic on the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean. The luxury passenger liner sank about 375 miles south of Newfoundland, Canada, after striking an iceberg on its maiden voyage from England to New York on April 15, 1912, killing 1,517 people. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
AP2012

Currency from Titanic wreck AP

FILE - In a Friday, Aug 15, 2008 file photo, currency, part of the artifacts collection of the Titanic, is shown at a warehouse in Atlanta.
AP

Titanic Expedition new pics

The last "davit" remaining on the wreck of RMS Titanic. These lifeboat cranes were used to hoist the ship's wooden lifeboats over the side and into the water during Titanic's sinking. Many of the boats launched soon after the sinking were not close to fullpassengers refused to believe the seriousness of the situation.
AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc

Titanic Bow Underwater

The bow of the Titanic rests on the bottom of the North Atlantic, about 400 miles southeast of Newfoundland. A team of scientists will launch an expedition to the Titanic on Aug. 18, 2010, to assess the deteriorating condition of the world's most famous shipwreck.
AP Photo/Ralph White

The port side of the bow section of the Titanic

This August 2010 photo provided by RMS Titanic Inc., shows the port side of the bow section. The rip in the hull can be seen clearly at right, with the stern coming to rest several thousand feet away. The small rectangular windows admit light into Titanics famous suites, while the square windows on the left mark the Private Promenade reserved for exclusive use of those booking the best shipboard accommodations in the world. Scientists were in court in Norfolk Va. revealing never-before-seen images of the Titanic and the ocean bottom where the violently strewn remnants of the world's most famous shipwreck rest nearly a century after it sank on its maiden voyage.
AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.

Captain Smith's Bathtub aboard the sunken Titanic

This August 2010 photo provided by RMS Titanic Inc., shows Captain Smiths Bathtub aboard the sunken ship. The plumbing allowed the Captain a choice of salt or fresh water, hot or cold. Scientists were in court in Norfolk Va. revealing never-before-seen images of the Titanic and the ocean bottom where the violently strewn remnants of the world's most famous shipwreck rest nearly a century after it sank on its maiden voyage.
AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.

Titanic Bacteria

August, 2010: Bacteria grows off the wreckage of the HMS Titanic.
RMS Titanic Inc.

the starboard side of the Titanic bow AP

In this Aug. 28, 2010 image released by Premier Exhibitions, Inc.-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the starboard side of the Titanic bow is shown.
AP Photo/Premier Exhibitions, Inc.-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

New images of sunken Titanic released

New images from the April 2012 edition of National Geographic magazine show the complete wreck of the Titanic for the first time ever. The luxury passenger liner sank 100 years ago after striking an iceberg on its maiden voyage, killing 1,517 people. All images copyright 2012 RMS Titanic, Inc; produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute

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