Insects

Bugging out: Up close and personal with icky insects

Photographer Colin Hutton has captured many of the world's overlooked creatures in astonishing detail. Photographing only live bugs, Hutton can spend up to 3 hours trying to keep the insects still while using a macro lens to create his portraits. He shared with FoxNews.com 15 of his favorite photographs. You can see the rest of his collection on his website ColinHuttonPhotography.com.

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Normally, male jumping spiders in the genus Phidippus are the more colorful sex, but in the case of the Apache jumper, the female is the clear winner.

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A male Phidippus insignarius jumping spider performs an elaborate courtship display for a female. During this part of the routine, he raises his body, lifts his front legs, and shuffles from side to side.

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Orchid bees don't actually feed on orchids, but rather the males use their modified legs to scrape scents from the orchids onto their bodies. These fragrances attracts females.

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This may not be the image that comes to mind when you hear glowworm, but this bizarre creature is the form taken by an adult male glowworm. The feathery antennae are used to detect the pheromones of females.

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Tiger beetles are named for their extreme speed and ferocity when hunting down prey.

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It's a hipster fly! Equipped with a "mustache" and "aviator shades", the horsefly has one of the most beautiful eyes in the insect world.

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Robber flies sit on a perch and use their large eyes to monitor for any insects that happen to fly by. These predators strike quickly and can take prey larger than their bodies.

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Spiny oak slug caterpillars and many other members of the family Limacodidae have urticating hairs which can be quite painful if touched. These caterpillars have a sticky pad instead of individual prolegs, hence the name slug caterpillar.

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You can tell that this is a male luna moth by the large leathery antennae, which he uses to track the pheromones of females.

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A large Polyphemus caterpillar strikes a rather devious pose. The color and texture of the skin give the impression that the caterpillar is glowing.

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An oak treehopper watches over her young.

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Treehoppers, such as this thorn treehopper, often taken on strange forms. This species tries to camouflage itself as a thorn.

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The Halloween Pennant is a common and widespread damselfly with beautifully colored wings. Here, you can see the details of the wing veins.

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This citrine forktail appears to be calling out from behind a flower petal. Damselflies often how very expressive faces. This is partly due to the presence of psudopupils which give the impression that they are looking right at you.

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Mantisflies look like a cross between a lacewing and a praying mantis. As with mantids, these insects are predators, and the larvae of this species feed on spider eggs.

Bugging out: Up close and personal with icky insects

Photographer Colin Hutton has captured many of the world's overlooked creatures in astonishing detail. Photographing only live bugs, Hutton can spend up to 3 hours trying to keep the insects still while using a macro lens to create his portraits. He shared with FoxNews.com 15 of his favorite photographs. You can see the rest of his collection on his website ColinHuttonPhotography.com.

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