Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egypt in pictures

From tombs more than 4,000 years old to the Great Pyramids of Giza to mummies, the latest archaeology finds from ancient Egypt's vibrant history.

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Dec. 8, 2012: The mummy of Merneptah was encased in a series of four sarcophagi, set one within the other. After his tomb was robbed, more than 3,000 years ago, he was reburied elsewhere and his two outer sarcophagi broken.
General Antiquites Egyptiennes du Musee du Caire

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Dec. 10, 2012: The oldest-known representations of a pharaoh are carved on rocks near the Nile River in southern Egypt, researchers report. Look closely -- standing on the top of this boat is a crowned figure who may represent Narmer, the first pharaoh to rule unified Egypt. Oarsmen propel the boat along.
Stan Hendrickx, John Coleman Darnell & Maria Carmela Gatto

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Dec. 6, 2012: This photo provided by the Italian Finance police shows an Egyptian sphinx confiscated by police from a greenhouse near Rome.
AP/Italian Finance Police

False Door to Tomb

July 8: Egyptian archaeologists have unveiled their latest discovery -- two 4,300-year-old tombs carved out of stone and unearthed in the ancient necropolis of Saqqara near Cairo. 

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AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

False Door to Tomb

July 8: Egyptian Antiquities chief Zahi Hawass shows the false door of the unearthed tomb that belongs to Shendwas, the father of Khonsu, both served as heads of the royal scribes during the Old Kingdom, in Saqqara near Cairo. 

AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

Step Pyramid of Djoser

July 8: With the Step Pyramid of King Djoser in the background, an Egyptian labor works at the site of the unearthed 4,300 year old tombs of Khonsu and his father Shendwas, both served as heads of the royal scribes during the Old Kingdom.

AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

Funeral Artifacts

July 8: An Egyptian Antiquities worker displays funeral artifacts recovered from the unearthed 4,300 year old tombs of Khonsu and his father Shendwas. Both served as heads of the royal scribes during the Old Kingdom.

AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

Mayor's Lost Tomb

The tomb of Ptahmes, the mayor of the ancient Egyptian capital Memphis, in Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt, is seen after archaeologists discover the 3,300-year-old tomb. Ptahmes' resting place had been lost under the desert sand since 1885 when treasure hunters first carted off some of its decorative wall panels, officials announced on May 30.

AP

Unfinished Funeral Painting

An unfinished funeral painting from the tomb of Ptahmes, the mayor of the ancient Egyptian capital Memphis, in Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt, is seen after archaeologists discover the 3,300-year-old tomb. Ptahmes' resting place had been lost under the desert sand since 1885 when treasure hunters first carted off some of its decorative wall panels, officials announced on May 30.

AP

Sacrifice Table from Tomb

A sacrifice table from the tomb of Ptahmes, the mayor of the ancient Egyptian capital Memphis, in Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt. Archaeologists discovered the 3,300-year-old tomb of Ptahmes earlier this year, whose resting place had been lost under the desert sand since 1885 when treasure hunters first carted off some of its decorative wall panels, officials announced Sunday.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

'Lost' Hieroglyphics

Hieroglyphics depicting the name and titled position of Ptahmes, the mayor of the ancient Egyptian capital Memphis, at his tomb in Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt. Archaeologists discovered the 3,300-year-old tomb of Ptahmes, earlier this year, whose resting place had been lost under the desert sand since 1885 when treasure hunters first carted off some of its decorative wall panels, officials announced Sunday.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Painted Wooden Sarcophagus

This undated photo released by the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities on May 23 shows a painted wooden sarcophagus discovered in Lahoun, near Fayoum, some 70 miles (100 kilometers) south of Cairo, in Egypt. The Supreme Council of Antiquities says archeologists have unearthed 57 ancient Egyptian tombs, most of them containing a painted wooden sarcophagus with a mummy inside, with the oldest tombs dating back to around 2750 B.C. and twelve of the tombs belonging to the 18th dynasty which ruled Egypt during the second millennium B.C.

AP

Wooden Sarcophagi

This undated photo released by the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities on Sunday, May 23, 2010, shows wooden sarcophagi discovered in Lahoun, near Fayoum, some 70 miles (100 kilometers) south of Cairo, in Egypt. The Supreme Council of Antiquities says archeologists have unearthed 57 ancient Egyptian tombs, most of them containing a painted wooden sarcophagus with a mummy inside, with the oldest tombs dating back to around 2750 B.C. and twelve of the tombs belonging to the 18th dynasty which ruled Egypt during the second millennium B.C. (AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities) ** EDITORIAL USE ONLY, NO SALES **
AP

Painted Wooden Sarcophagus

This undated photo released by the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities on May 23 shows a painted wooden sarcophagus discovered in Lahoun, near Fayoum, some 70 miles (100 kilometers) south of Cairo, in Egypt.

AP

Tomb of Ken-Amun

April 14: Details are seen in the tomb of Ken-Amun, an overseer of the royal records during the 19th Dynasty (1315-1201 B.C.), near Ismailia, 75 miles east of Cairo in Egypt. Egyptian antiquities chief Zahi Hawass said Wednesday that the elaborate tomb of the ancient royal scribe was unearthed beneath 35 Roman-era graves at the site.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Excavating Tomb of Ken-Amun

April 14: Archaeological workers excavate at the site of the tomb of Ken-Amun, an overseer of the royal records during the 19th Dynasty (1315-1201 B.C.), near Ismailia, 75 miles east of Cairo in Egypt. Egyptian antiquities chief Zahi Hawass said Wednesday that the elaborate tomb of the ancient royal scribe was unearthed beneath 35 Roman-era graves at the site.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Tomb of Ken-Amun

April 14: The above-ground site of the tomb of Ken-Amun, an overseer of the royal records during the 19th Dynasty (1315-1201 B.C.), is seen near Ismailia, 75 miles east of Cairo in Egypt. Egyptian antiquities chief Zahi Hawass said Wednesday that the elaborate tomb of the ancient royal scribe was unearthed beneath 35 Roman-era graves at the site.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Details at Tomb of Ken-Amun

April 14: Details are seen in the tomb of Ken-Amun, an overseer of the royal records during the 19th Dynasty (1315-1201 B.C.), near Ismailia, 75 miles east of Cairo in Egypt. Egyptian antiquities chief Zahi Hawass said Wednesday that the elaborate tomb of the ancient royal scribe was unearthed beneath 35 Roman-era graves at the site.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Sons of Horus

April 12: A gold relief representing the four sons of the Egyptian god Horus, found in a newly uncovered complex of tombs at the remote Bahariya desert oasis area some 186 miles southwest of Cairo in Egypt. Egyptian archaeologists have discovered an intricate carved plaster sarcophagus portraying a wide-eyed woman dressed in a tunic, and other items, in a newly uncovered complex of tombs at the remote desert oasis.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Roman Mummy Uncovered

April 12: A 3-foot tall intricately carved plaster sarcophagus portraying a wide-eyed woman dressed in a tunic, in a newly uncovered complex of tombs at the remote Bahariya desert oasis area some 186 miles southwest of Cairo in Egypt. Archaeologist Mahmoud Afifi, who led the dig, said the new find had not been dated but the burial style indicated the sarcophagus belonged to Egypt's long period of Roman rule, from 31 B.C. until the Arab invasions of the 7th century.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Roman Mummy Uncovered

April 12: Archaeologists work around a 3-foot tall intricately carved plaster sarcophagus portraying a wide-eyed woman dressed in a tunic, in a newly uncovered complex of tombs at the remote Bahariya desert oasis area some 186 miles southwest of Cairo in Egypt. Archaeologist Mahmoud Afifi, who led the dig, said the new find had not been dated but the burial style indicated the sarcophagus belonged to Egypt's long period of Roman rule, from 31 B.C. until the Arab invasions of the 7th century.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Egypt Mummy

A 3-foot tall intricately carved plaster sarcophagus portraying a wide-eyed woman dressed in a tunic was found in a newly uncovered complex of tombs at the remote Bahariya desert oasis area 186 miles southwest of Cairo in Egypt. Archaeologist Mahmoud Afifi, who led the dig, said the new find had not been dated but the burial style indicated the sarcophagus belonged to Egypt's long period of Roman rule, from 31 B.C. until the Arab invasions of the 7th century.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Akhenaton Carvings

March 11: A stela at the Egyptian museum in Cairo shows Pharaoh Akhenaten, his Queen Nefertiti and their children worshipping the sun in the more natural artistic style of the time. The identification of Akhenaten's mummy through DNA tests could be a step toward filling out the picture of a time 3,300 years ago when Akhenaten embarked on history's first experiment with monotheism.

AP Photo/Paul Schemm

Queen Behenu Burial Chamber

March 3: Part of the unearthed burial chamber (with well preserved religious texts) of the more than 4,000-year-old Queen Behenu from Egypt's Old Kingdom, at the ancient burial site in Saqqara, Egypt.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Heretic Akhenaton

March 10: Tourists view the colossus of Pharaoh Akhenaten in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Egypt. His elongated head and feminine hips had long confounded Egyptologists. The identification of Akhenaten's mummy through DNA tests could be a step toward filling out the picture of a time 3,300 years ago when Akhenaten embarked on history's first experiment with monotheism.

AP Photo/Paul Schemm

Stolen Sarcophagus

Feb. 22: Egypt says the United States has agreed to return a 3,000-year-old wooden sarcophagus that illegally left the country 40 years ago. The ancient wooden sarcophagus dated back to the 21st Dynasty and belonged to a private individual named Imesy. 

AP Photo / Supreme Council of Antiquities

Stolen Sarcophagus

Feb. 22: Egypt says the United States has agreed to return a 3,000-year-old wooden sarcophagus that illegally left the country 40 years ago. The ancient wooden sarcophagus dated back to the 21st Dynasty and belonged to a private individual named Imesy. 

AP Photo / Supreme Council of Antiquities

Amenhotep III, Uncovered

Feb. 28: Egypt's Culture Ministry says a team of Egyptian and European archaeologists has unearthed a large head made of red granite of an ancient pharaoh who ruled Egypt some 3,400 years ago. The newly unearthed red-granite head, part of a huge statue of the ancient pharaoh Amenhotep III, was found at the pharaoh's mortuary temple in the city of Luxor. 

AP Photo / Supreme Council of Antiquities

Amenhotep III, Uncovered

Feb. 28: Egypt's Culture Ministry says a team of Egyptian and European archaeologists has unearthed a large head made of red granite of an ancient pharaoh who ruled Egypt some 3,400 years ago. The newly unearthed red-granite head, part of a huge statue of the ancient pharaoh Amenhotep III, was found at the pharaoh's mortuary temple in the city of Luxor. 

AP Photo / Supreme Council of Antiquities

The Golden Sarcophagus

Feb. 17: One of Egypt's famed King Tutankhamun's golden sarcophagus is displayed at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Two years of DNA testing and CT scans on King Tutankhamun's 3,300-year-old mummy and 15 others have provided the cause of death and the firmest family tree yet for Tut -- pointing to Pharaoh Akhenaten as Tut's father, Akhenaten's sister as Tut's mother, and Queen Tiye as Tut's grandmother.

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

King Tut's Family

Feb .17: Mummies from foreground to background, King Tut's mother, grandmother, and Tut's father Akhenaten, in rear background, during a press conference by the head of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities to announce DNA results meant to reveal the parentage of Egypt's famed King Tutankhamun at the Egyptian museum in Cairo. Two years of DNA testing and CT scans on King Tutankhamun's 3,300-year-old mummy and 15 others have provided the cause of death and the firmest family tree yet for Tut.

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Tut's Mommy's Mummy

Feb. 17: The mummy of King Tut's grandmother Queen Tiye, seen through a glass case, is displayed for media during a press conference with Egypt's top archaeologist Zahi Hawass, unseen, at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Two years of DNA testing and CT scans on King Tutankhamun's 3,300-year-old mummy and 15 others have provided the cause of death and the firmest family tree yet for Tut.

AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

Testing King Tut

Egypt's antiquities chief Dr. Zahi Hawass, center, supervises the removal of King Tut from his stone sarcophagus in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt. Egypt will soon reveal the results of DNA tests made on the world's most famous ancient king, the young Pharaoh Tutankhamun, to answer lingering mysteries over his lineage, said the antiquities department.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

Testing King Tut

The face of the linen-wrapped mummy of King Tut beams beneath his new glass case in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt. Egypt will soon reveal the results of DNA tests made on the world's most famous ancient king, the young Pharaoh Tutankhamun, to answer lingering mysteries over his lineage, said the antiquities department.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

Testing King Tut

Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass speaks at the moving of the linen-wrapped mummy of King Tut from his stone sarcophagus in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt. Egypt will soon reveal the results of DNA tests made on the world's most famous ancient king, the young Pharaoh Tutankhamun, to answer lingering mysteries over his lineage.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

Testing King Tut

The sarcophagus of King Tut is placed back in his underground tomb in the famed Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt. Egypt will soon reveal the results of DNA tests made on the world's most famous ancient king, the young Pharaoh Tutankhamun, to answer lingering mysteries over his lineage, said the antiquities department.

AP Photo/Ben Curtis

World's Oldest Christian Monastery

An Egyptian man inspects the guests quarters, part of the completed restoration works at the Monastery of St. Antony, near Suez city, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2010. Egypt's antiquities chief on Thursday unveiled the completion of an 8-year, $14.5 million restoration of the world's oldest Christian monastery, touting it as a sign of Christian-Muslim coexistence.

AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

World's Oldest Christian Monastery

A woman lights a candle at the restored church, part of the completed restoration works at the Monastery of St. Antony, south the Red Sea of Suez city, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2010. Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass on Thursday unveiled the completion of an 8-year, $14.5 million restoration of the world's oldest Christian monastery, touting it as a sign of Christian-Muslim coexistence.

AP Photo/Nasser Nasser

The Alley of Sphinxes

Egyptian workers in Luxor, Egypt, restore the Alley of Sphinxes, Sunday, Jan. 24, 2010, known as the "Kebash Road", which was originally lined with 1,200 sphinxes and was built by Amenhotep III in the 12th century B.C .Luxor is set to become the world's largest open-air museum as a multi-million dollar project to restore the Alley of Sphinxes begins in the south of Egypt, said the governor of Luxor Sunday.

AP Photo/Saedi Press

The Alley of Sphinxes

Egyptian workers in Luxor, Egypt, restore the Alley of Sphinxes, Sunday, Jan. 24, 2010, known as the "Kebash Road", which was originally lined with 1,200 sphinxes and was built by Amenhotep III in the 12th century B.C .Luxor is set to become the world's largest open-air museum as a multi-million dollar project to restore the Alley of Sphinxes begins in the south of Egypt, said the governor of Luxor Sunday.

AP Photo/Saedi Press

Stolen Antiquities

Cyprus police said they had broken up an antiquities theft ring negotiating a $15.5 million deal to sell artifacts dating as far back as 2,000 B.C. Police spokesman Michalis Katsounotos said 10 Cypriots had been arrested and another five, including a Syrian man, were being sought in the case, believed to be the largest of its kind in the Mediterranean island's history. The suspects face charges of illegally possessing and trading in antiquities. The miniature gold coffin and other gold objects here don't appear to be Cypriot...

AP Photo/Cyprus Police, HO

Adamic Limestone Head

Jan. 19: An Adamic limestone head was found amongst the temple's ruins in the Kom el-Dekkah area of the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria. Egypt says its archaeologists have unearthed a Ptolemic temple dating back more than 2,000 years and which may have been dedicated to the ancient cat-goddess Bastet. Read more.

AP Photo/Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, HO

The Remains of Ptolemy Temple

Jan. 19: The remains of Ptolemy temple were unearthed in the Kom el-Dekkah area of the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria. Egypt says its archaeologists have unearthed a Ptolemic temple dating back more than 2,000 years and which may have been dedicated to the ancient cat-goddess Bastet.

AP Photo/Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, HO

The Cat-Goddess Bastet

Jan. 19: A carving of the ancient cat-goddess Bastet found amongst the temple's ruins in the Kom el-Dekkah area of the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria. Egypt says its archaeologists have unearthed a Ptolemic temple dating back more than 2,000 years and which may have been dedicated to the ancient cat-goddess Bastet.

AP Photo/Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, HO

Barnum's Mummy

Jan. 14: An Egyptian mummy known as Pa-Ib and believed to be about 4,000 years old has been in the Barnum Museum in Bridgeport since the 1890s -- it was a prized exhibit of the flamboyant showman P.T. Barnum. Researchers examined it with the latest imaging technology, but found no evidence that a packet inside her was an offering to the gods of the ancient world. Read more.

AP Photo/Douglas Healey

Ancient Head of Pa-Ib

Jan. 14: A CT scanner took thousands of images of 4,000-year-old mummy Pa-Ib, images eight times the resolution of tests done in 2006, and a tiny camera was inserted inside the mummy's skull. Researchers expect to report their conclusions in March. Researchers said her teeth were worn, suggesting the diet of a commoner. 

The woman could have been a servant but probably didn't do a lot of manual labor, given the condition of her joints, said Gerald Conlogue, co-director of the Bioanthropology Research Institute at Quinnipiac. The embalming process also appeared rushed, further evidence that the woman was not royalty, Conlogue said.

AP Photo/Douglas Healey

The Torso of Pa-Ib

Jan. 14: Previous tests led to speculation that the packet inside 4,000-year-old mummy Pa-Ib was a bird mummy -- something researchers said would be an unusual and exciting find -- but high-resolution tests at Quinnipiac University showed no remnants of a bird. Instead, researchers said the packet and a few others in the mummy likely contained organs, which were sometimes preserved and placed back in mummies for use in the afterlife.

AP Photo/Douglas Healey

Barnum's Mummy

Jan. 14: Researchers also are trying to figure out whether a 4,000-year-old mummy known as Pa-Ib ever gave birth, because earlier tests showed evidence of arthritis in the pelvic area, which is common with women who have given birth. Lead investigator Conlogue offered no definitive answer, but said wrappings put on tightly could change the position of bones.

The tests did not determine a cause of death, but researchers were looking at possible signs of a calcium buildup in one of the packets that could suggest an infection.

AP Photo/Douglas Healey

The Builders' Bones

Jan. 11: Bones, believed to belong to the pyramid builders, lie in a tomb near the site of the Pyramids, in Giza, Egypt, Monday. Egyptian archaeologists discovered a new set of tombs belonging to the workers who built the great pyramids, shedding light on how the laborers lived and ate more than 4,000 years ago. Read more.

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Zahi Hawass, on the Scene

Jan. 11: Zahi Hawass, the director of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, points at a new set of tombs belonging to the workers who built the great pyramids, while standing in front of the Great Pyramid in Giza, Egypt. The discovery shedding light on how the laborers lived and ate more than 4,000 years ago, the antiquities department said.

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Locating the Tombs

Jan. 11: Newly-discovered tombs of workers are seen with the Great Pyramid in background, in Giza, Egypt. Egyptian archaeologists have discovered a new set of tombs of the workers who built the great pyramids, shedding new light on how the laborers lived and ate more than 4,000 years ago, the antiquities department said Sunday. Zahi Hawass, the director of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, says the tombs are significant because they show that the pyramids were not built by slaves, but rather free workers.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Pottery and Bones

Jan. 11: Pottery and bones in a tomb, in Giza, Egypt. Egyptian archaeologists have discovered a new set of tombs of the workers who built the great pyramids, shedding new light on how the laborers lived and ate more than 4,000 years ago, the antiquities department said Sunday. Zahi Hawass, the director of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, says the tombs are significant because they show that the pyramids were not built by slaves, but rather free workers.

AP Photo/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Archaeologists Dig Out the Tombs

Jan. 11: Egyptian archaeology workers dig tombs in front of the Great Pyramid, in Giza, Egypt. Egyptian archaeologists discovered a new set of tombs belonging to the workers who built the great pyramids, shedding light on how the laborers lived and ate more than 4,000 years ago, the antiquities department said.

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Archaeologist Near the Great Pyramid

Jan. 11: Egyptian archaeology workers ferrying sand in trolleys on rail tracks in front of the Great Pyramid, in Giza, Egypt. Egyptian archaeologists discovered a new set of tombs belonging to the workers who built the great pyramids, shedding light on how the laborers lived and ate more than 4,000 years ago, the antiquities department said .

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Archaeologist Near the Great Pyramid

Egyptian archaeology workers ferrying sand in trolleys on rail tracks in front of the Great Pyramid, in Giza, Egypt, Monday, Jan. 11, 2010. Egyptian archaeologists discovered a new set of tombs belonging to the workers who built the great pyramids, shedding light on how the laborers lived and ate more than 4,000 years ago, the antiquities department said.

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Egyptian Archaeologists

Jan. 11: Egyptian archaeology workers walk in front of the Great Pyramid, in Giza, Egypt. Egyptian archaeologists discovered a new set of tombs belonging to the workers who built the great pyramids, shedding light on how the laborers lived and ate more than 4,000 years ago, the antiquities department said.

AP Photo/Amr Nabil

Ancient Wall Paintings

Dec. 14, 2009: France on Monday handed over to Egyptian officials five fragments of an ancient wall painting at the center of a dispute between Egypt and the Louvre Museum. Egypt's antiquities czar Zahi Hawass cut ties with the Louvre in October, saying the famed Paris museum had refused to return the fragments. Egyptian officials said the artifacts, from a 3,200-year-old tomb near the ancient temple city of Luxor, were stolen in the 1980s. Read more. 

AP

The Bent Pyramid

March 17, 2009: Travelers to Egypt will soon be able to explore the inner chambers of the 4,500-year-old "bent" pyramid, known for its oddly shaped profile, and other nearby ancient tombs. The increased access to the pyramids south of Cairo is part of a new sustainable development campaign that Egypt hopes will attract more visitors but also to avoid some of the problems of the urban sprawl that have plagued the famed pyramids of Giza. Read more.

Ivrienen/Creative Commons

Laborers Dig Out a Shaft

Feb. 11, 2009: Egyptian laborers work inside a shaft at the excavation site near the burial chamber where eight revealed sarcophagi found inside a 26th Dynasty limestone sarcophagus along with other mummies at the ancient necropolis of Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt. Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass has unveiled a completely preserved mummy inside a limestone sarcophagus sealed 2,600 years ago during pharaonic times.

AP

Mummy in Limestone Sarcophagus

Feb. 11, 2009: An Egyptian worker holds a torch by one of eight revealed sarcophagi found inside a 26th Dynasty limestone sarcophagus along with other mummies at the ancient necropolis of Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt. Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass has unveiled a completely preserved mummy inside a limestone sarcophagus sealed 2,600 years ago during pharaonic times.

AP

Brushing Sand from a Mummy

Feb. 11, 2009: An Egyptian worker brushes away the sand on one of eight revealed sarcophagi found inside a 26th Dynasty limestone sarcophagus along with other mummies at the ancient necropolis of Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt. Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass has unveiled a completely preserved mummy inside a limestone sarcophagus sealed 2,600 years ago during pharaonic times.

AP

Inside the Sarcophagus

Feb. 11, 2009: An Egyptian worker brushes away the sand on one of eight revealed sarcophagi found inside a 26th Dynasty limestone sarcophagus along with other mummies at the ancient necropolis of Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt. Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass has unveiled a completely preserved mummy inside a limestone sarcophagus sealed 2,600 years ago during pharaonic times.

AP

Mummies Discovered in Egyptian Tomb

Feb. 11, 2009: Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass, left brushes away the sand to reveal a wooden sarcophagus, one of eight sarcophagi found inside a 26th Dynasty limestone sarcophagus along with other mummies at the ancient necropolis of Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt. Hawass has unveiled a completely preserved mummy inside a limestone sarcophagus sealed 2,600 years ago during pharaonic times.

AP

Inside a Tomb

Feb. 11, 2009: Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass, left brushes away the sand to reveal a wooden sarcophagus, one of eight sarcophagi found inside a 26th Dynasty limestone sarcophagus along with other mummies at the ancient necropolis of Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt. Hawass has unveiled a completely preserved mummy inside a limestone sarcophagus sealed 2,600 years ago during pharaonic times.

AP

Wooden Sarcophagus Revealed

Feb. 11, 2009: Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass, left brushes away the sand to reveal a wooden sarcophagus, one of eight sarcophagi found inside a 26th Dynasty limestone sarcophagus along with other mummies at the ancient necropolis of Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt. Hawass has unveiled a completely preserved mummy inside a limestone sarcophagus sealed 2,600 years ago during pharaonic times.

AP

Zahi Hawass with Wooden Sarcophagus

Feb. 11, 2009: Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass, stands with wooden sarcophagus, one of eight sarcophagi found inside a 26th Dynasty limestone sarcophagus along with other mummies at the ancient necropolis of Saqqara, south of Cairo, Egypt. Hawass has unveiled a completely preserved mummy inside a limestone sarcophagus sealed 2,600 years ago during pharaonic times.

AP

Egyptian Sarcophagus

Feb. 8, 2009: A newly-discovered Egyptian mummy in a sarcophagus is seen in a tomb at Saqqara, south of Cairo. A storehouse of 30 Egyptians mummies was unearthed inside a 2,600-year-old tomb, in a new round of excavations at the vast necropolis. The tomb was located at the bottom of a 36 foot deep shaft, announced Egypt's top archaeologist Zahi Hawass, and eight of the mummies were in sarcophagi while the rest had been placed in niches along the wall. Read more.

AP/Supreme Council of Antiquities

Egyptian Sarcophagus

Feb. 8, 2009: Egypt's top archaeologist, Zahi Hawass, examines a newly-discovered mummy in a sarcophagus in a tomb at Saqqara, south of Cairo. Hawass described the discovery as a "storeroom for mummies," dating to 640 B.C. and the 26th Dynasty, which was Egypt's last independent kingdom before it was overthrown by a succession of foreign conquerors beginning with the Persians.

AP/Supreme Council of Anitquities

4,300-Year-Old Pyramid

Nov. 12, 2008: Archaeologists have discovered a new pyramid under the sands of Saqqara, an ancient burial site that has yielded a string of unearthed pyramids in recent years but remains largely unexplored. The 4,300-year-old monument most likely belonged to the queen mother of the founder of Egypt's 6th Dynasty, and was built several hundred years after the famed Great Pyramids of Giza, antiquities chief Zahi Hawass told reporters. Read more.

AP

Ancient Egypt in pictures

From tombs more than 4,000 years old to the Great Pyramids of Giza to mummies, the latest archaeology finds from ancient Egypt's vibrant history.

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