SCIENCE

Titanic Expedition Produces Crisp New Images
Scientists were in court in Norfolk Va. revealing never-before-seen images of the Titanic and the ocean bottom where the violently strewn remnants of the world's most famous shipwreck rest nearly a century after it sank on its maiden voyage.

The Titanic

Scientists showed some never before seen images of the Titanic in a Virginia courtroom Thursday, pics take from a remote-controlled submersible vehicle in an ongoing salvage claim involving the world's most famous shipwreck. 

F.G.O. Stuart (1843-1923)

Titanic_Expedition_new_pics_2

Here, the last "davit" remaining on the wreck of RMS Titanic. These lifeboat cranes were used to hoist the ship's wooden lifeboats over the side and into the water during Titanic's sinking. Many of the boats launched soon after the sinking were not close to fullpassengers refused to believe the seriousness of the situation.

AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc

Captain Smith's Bathtub aboard the sunken Titanic

This photo shows Captain Smith's bathtub aboard the sunken ship. The plumbing allowed the Captain a choice of salt or fresh water, hot or cold. 

AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.

The port side of the bow section of the Titanic

The port side of the bow section clearly shows a rip in the hull at right, with the stern coming to rest several thousand feet away. The small rectangular windows admit light into Titanic's famous suites, while the square windows on the left mark the Private Promenade reserved for exclusive use of those booking the best shipboard accommodations in the world. 

AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.

Titanic_Expedition_new_pics_4

This photo taken at the Titanic's wreck site displays two windows from first-class cabins. The window on the left leads to Stateroom W, while the window on the right leads to Stateroom U.

AP Photo/RMS Titanic Inc.

Titanic Revisited

A team of scientists used a pair of robots to take thousands of photographs and hours of video of the wreck in 2010, which lies roughly 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) below the surface near St. John's, Newfoundland. The starboard side of the Titanic bow is shown in this photo.

AP Photo/Premier Exhibitions, Inc./Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Treasure Hunting

Scientists are using imaging technology and sonar devices that have never been used before on the Titanic wreck. They are probing nearly a century of sediment in the debris field to seek a full inventory of the ship's artifacts.

AP Photo/Premier Exhibitions, Inc./Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Hurricane Danielle

The 2010 expedition fully mapped the 5km-by-8km wreck site, which is located 4000m below the ocean's surface. The experts said the entire debris field has now been documented for the first time.

AP Photo/Premier Exhibitions, Inc.-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Bird's Eye View

Sonar imaging allowed for a never-before-seen perspective of Titanic's bow. Visible are the mast, superstructure and openings for the one and two funnels, as well as the Grand Staircase.

Waitt Institutes/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/Premier Exhibitions

Titanic_Bow_Underwater

The bow of the Titanic rests on the bottom of the North Atlantic, about 400 miles southeast of Newfoundland. 

AP Photo/Ralph White

Titanic Expedition Produces Crisp New Images

Scientists were in court in Norfolk Va. revealing never-before-seen images of the Titanic and the ocean bottom where the violently strewn remnants of the world's most famous shipwreck rest nearly a century after it sank on its maiden voyage.

More From Our Sponsors