Science

Ruins of Crusaders Discovered Beneath Israeli City
One of the richest archaeological sites in a country full of them is just now being uncovered: the walled port of Acre, where the busy alleys of an Ottoman-era town cover a uniquely intact Crusader city.

workers_in_a_section_of_the_Crusader_town

June, 19, 2011: Workers in a section of the Crusader town underneath the old port city of Acre, on the Mediterranean coast in northern Israel. Off the track beaten by most Holy Land tourists lies one of the richest archaeological sites in a country full of them: Acre, where the busy alleys of an Ottoman-era town cover a uniquely intact Crusader city now being rediscovered.

AP Photo/Ariel Schalit

Tunnel_Built_by_Knights_Templar

June, 19, 2011: A tunnel built by knights of the Templar order under the old port city of Acre, on the Mediterranean coast in northern Israel. "It's like Pompeii of Roman times -- it's a complete city," said Eliezer Stern, the Israeli archaeologist in charge of Acre. He called the town "one of the most exciting sites in the world of archaeology."

AP Photo/Ariel Schalit

Youths_stand_on_wall_surrounding_Acre

June, 19, 2011: Israeli Arab youths stand on the wall surrounding the old port city of Acre. Today, old Acre is a picturesque enclave jutting into the Mediterranean, home to 5,000 Arab citizens of Israel who live in dense warrens of homes that are themselves historic artifacts. Most residents are poor.

AP Photo/Ariel Schalit

Youth_jumps_off_the_seawall_surrounding_Acre

June, 19, 2011: An Israeli Arab youth jumps off the 250-year-old seawall surrounding the old port of Acre. The newly excavated area, part of a Crusader neighborhood, is set to open later this year.

AP Photo/Ariel Schalit

the old port city of Acre on the Mediterranean coast

June, 19, 2011: The old port city of Acre on the Mediterranean coast in northern Israel. In 2001, Acre became Israel's first UNESCO World Heritage site. But whether because of its out-of-the-way location in the country's north or simply because it must compete with better-known sites like Jerusalem and the desert fortress of Masada, Acre has been overshadowed.

AP Photo/Ariel Schalit

Ottoman_era_inn_known_as_Khan_al_Umdan

June, 19, 2011: The Ottoman-era inn known as Khan al-Umdan in the old port city of Acre. Acre has existed for at least 4,500 years, but reached the height of its importance with the Crusader conquest in 1104.

AP Photo/Ariel Schalit

graffiti_left_by_a_medieval_traveler

June, 19, 2011: Etched in plaster on one wall was a coat of arms -- graffiti left by a medieval traveler. Nearby was a main street of cobblestones and a row of shops that once sold clay figurines and ampules for holy water, popular souvenirs for pilgrims..

AP Photo/Ariel Schalit

Ruins of Crusaders Discovered Beneath Israeli City

One of the richest archaeological sites in a country full of them is just now being uncovered: the walled port of Acre, where the busy alleys of an Ottoman-era town cover a uniquely intact Crusader city.

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