science

Human Evolution: A Visual History
Surprising fossil finds are creating messy kinks in the iconic straight line of human evolution. So much for a simple journey from knuckle-dragging ape to briefcase-carrying man.

Kadanuumuu

The anatomically arranged elements of a partial skeleton called KSD-VP-1/1 -- a male Australopithecus afarensis found in Ethiopia and nicknamed "Kadanuumuu." Scientists believe the new fossil find may be the great, great, great, etc., grandfather of the famous fossil Lucy.

Yohannes Haile-Selassie, Liz Russell, Cleveland Museum of Natural History

Lucy_Fossil

The 3.2 million year old Australopithecus afarensis skeleton called Lucy, part of a 2007 exhibit, is displayed at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. The exhibit was rare, since Lucy is rarely seen in public outside her native Ethiopia; the trip unleashed an international furor among scientists.

AP Photo / Michael Stravato

Homo Floresiensis Skull

Professor Chris Stringer, Head of Human Origins at London's Natural History Museum, holds a cast taken from a skull that is said to be that of a new species in the evolution of man named 'Homo Floresiensis' during a news conference in London, Wednesday Oct. 27, 2004.

AP Photo/Richard Lewis

Homo Floresiensis Skull

A researcher holds a skull of a Homo floresiensis in Indonesia. The race of hobbit-like creatures may once have existed on the remote island of Flores, where an international team is trying to shed light on the fossilized 18,000-year-old skeleton of a dwarf cavewoman whose discovery in 2003 was an international sensation.

AP Photo/Puslitbang Arkenas

Homo Floresiensis Skeleton

A skeleton of Homo floresiensis that was discovered in Liang Bua cave in Ruteng, Flores island, Indonesia. An international team is trying to shed light on the fossilized 18,000-year-old skeleton whose discovery in 2003 was an international sensation.

AP Photo/Department of Anatomical Sciences of Stony Brook University Medical Center, William Jungers

Toumai_Skull

A video still shows the "Toumai" skull, species Sahelanthropus tchadensis, unearthed in Chad, Africa, in 2002. At six to seven million years old, the skull dates to about the time where, according to genetic data, the ancestors of humans and the ancestors of chimpanzees went their separate evolutionary ways. 

AP

Homo_Erectus_Skull

Frederick Kyalo Manthi, Phd, holds the H. erectus complete skull he discovered in 2000 near lake Turkana in Kenya, Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2007 at the National Museum of Kenya in Nairobi. Surprising fossils dug up in Africa are creating messy kinks in the iconic straight line of human evolution from knuckle-dragging ape to briefcase-carrying man.

AP Photo/Karel Prinsloo

Homo_Erectus_Skull_2

A photo provided by the National Museum of Kenya and Nature shows the Homo erectus skull in side view, after painstaking preparation to remove the sandstone. Surprising fossils such as this one dug up in Africa are creating messy kinks in the iconic straight line of human evolution with its knuckle-dragging ape and briefcase-carrying man.

AP Photo/National Museums of Kenya/F. Spoor

Smithsonian_Exhibit_on_Human_Evolution_3

Part of the exhibit comparing the brain size of early humans is seen inside the David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, on Wednesday, March 17, 2010.

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Smithsonian_Exhibit_on_Human_Evolution_2

Early human skeletons are seen in the David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, on Wednesday, March 17, 2010.

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Smithsonian_Exhibit_on_Human_Evolution

Fossil skulls of La Ferrassie Neanderthal, left, and Cro-Magnon, that are on a three-month loan from the Musee de l'Homme in France, are seen in the David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins exhibit at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, on Wednesday, March 17, 2010.

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Smithsonian_Exhibit_on_Human_Evolution_5

A wall comparing skulls of early humans is seen inside the David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, on Wednesday, March 17, 2010.

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Smithsonian_Exhibit_on_Human_Evolution_4

A "high-definition diorama" is seen at the David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins exhibit is seen at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, on Wednesday, March 17, 2010.

AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Human Evolution: A Visual History

Surprising fossil finds are creating messy kinks in the iconic straight line of human evolution. So much for a simple journey from knuckle-dragging ape to briefcase-carrying man.

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