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Ancient skeletons dug up at Florence's Uffizi

  • Italy Uffizi Ancient cemetery.jpg

    Feb. 13, 2014: Archaeologists work in an ancient cemetery with dozens of skeletons that was unearthed during works to expand the Uffizi Gallery's exhibit space, In Florence, Italy. In five months of digging, archaeologists uncovered 60 well-preserved skeletons in the cemetery. Archaeologist Andrea Pessina said DNA testing will aim to find evidence of what "certainly was an extremely lethal epidemic," possibly the plague.AP Photo/Francesco Bellini

  • Italy Uffizi Ancient cemetery 1.jpg

    Feb. 13, 2014: Archaeologists work in an ancient cemetery with dozens of skeletons that was unearthed during works to expand the Uffizi Gallery's exhibit space, In Florence, Italy. In five months of digging, archaeologists uncovered 60 well-preserved skeletons in the cemetery. Archaeologist Andrea Pessina said DNA testing will aim to find evidence of what "certainly was an extremely lethal epidemic," possibly the plague.AP Photo/Francesco Bellini

Work to expand the Uffizi Gallery's exhibit space has unearthed an ancient cemetery with dozens of skeletons archaeologists say might have been victims of the plague or some other epidemic that swept through Florence during the 4th or 5th century.

Archaeologists and art officials showed reporters Wednesday the excavation at the renowned museum. In five months of digging, archaeologists uncovered 60 well-preserved skeletons in a cemetery apparently made in a hurry, perhaps a mass grave, with bodies laid side-by-side at roughly the same time.

Lack of signs of wounds or malnutrition also could point to death by disease. Archaeologist Andrea Pessina says DNA testing will aim to find evidence of what "certainly was an extremely lethal epidemic," possibly the plague.

Work to build an elevator revealed the burial site.