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Tally in Florida python hunt holds at 50 snakes

  • Python Challenge 1.jpg

    Jan. 19, 2013: Bill Booth of Bradenton, Fla. holds a dead Burmese python he caught in the Florida Everglades as part of the monthlong "Python Challenge." (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

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    Jan. 19, 2013: Bill Booth of Bradenton, Fla. stretches out dead Burmese python he caught, for students from the University of Florida to measure, in the Florida Everglades as part of the monthlong "Python Challenge." (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

  • Python Challenge 2.jpg

    In this Jan. 16, 2013 photo, Jim Howard of Cooper City, Fla., examines a piece of a large snake skin he found under some foliage in the Florida Everglades during his search of pythons as part of the monthlong "Python Challenge." Wildlife officials say more than 1,000 people signed up for the competition that began Saturday and ends Feb. 10. The state hopes the hunters will help researchers collect more information about the pythons. The large snakes are an invasive species and are considered a menace to Florida's swamplands. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee) (AP2013)

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    Jan. 16, 2013: Jim Howard of Cooper City, Fla., searches under the dense foliage in the Florida Everglades looking for pythons as part of the monthlong "Python Challenge." (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

More than 1,500 hunters are struggling to find more Burmese pythons as a public hunt for the invasive species continues in the Everglades.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission said Friday that the tally of pythons killed in the Python Challenge is holding at 50. That number hasn't changed since Tuesday.

The hunt began Jan. 12 and ends Sunday. State officials hope to raise awareness about the threats invasive species pose to native wildlife. University of Florida researchers are examining the snake carcasses.

Two python hunters from Tennessee had to be airlifted Thursday from the Everglades. The Broward Sheriff's Office says they became "stranded and disoriented" and had to be rescued by helicopter.

Authorities say the men "complained of lightheadedness and weakness and were suffering from heat exhaustion and dehydration."