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Skydiver aims for supersonic plunge Oct. 8 from record 23 miles over New Mexico

  • Baumgartner test 2 july 6.jpg

    June 21, 2012: Felix Baumgartner during the first high-altitude test jump in Taft, Calif. (Luke Aikins/Red Bull Content Pool)

  • Supersonic Skydiver Felix.jpg

    Sept. 24, 2012: A crew member adjusts the space capsule of the Red Bull Stratos mission in the pressure chamber at Brooks Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. (AP Photo/Red Bull, Garth Milan)

  • Baumgartner test 2 july.jpg

    July 23, 2012: Crew members cover the capsule to protect it from rain before the second manned test flight in Roswell, N.M. (balazsgardi.com/Red Bull Content Pool)

The countdown is on for skydiver Felix Baumgartner. In just two weeks, the Austrian parachutist will attempt to go supersonic when he jumps from a record altitude of 23 miles (37 kilometers) over the U.S.

Baumgartner expects to reach a top speed of 690 mph (1,110 kph) and break the sound barrier with only his body.

Project managers announced Tuesday the attempt will take place Oct. 8, a delay from August.

'I feel like a tiger in a cage waiting to get out.'

- Felix Baumgartner

"I feel like a tiger in a cage waiting to get out," Baumgartner, 43, said in a statement.

He jumped from 18 miles (29 kilometers) in July. This time, he hopes to break the all-time record of 19.5 miles (31 kilometers) set in 1960.

Baumgartner's capsule was damaged in the latest practice jump and had to be repaired and retested. A giant helium balloon will lift the pressurized capsule with Baumgartner inside, dressed in a pressure suit.

Project officials note that excellent weather will be needed for the October launch. Early fall is generally an optimal time for such endeavors.

The flight will be monitored by a NASA-like Mission Control, though the effort is privately funded by the energy drink maker Red Bull. One team leader is record-holder Joe Kittinger, who was a U.S. Air Force captain when he took part in the record-setting military high-jump project decades ago.