A simple gnocchi recipe can be a great way to spend time with your loved ones and bring a group together. This recipe reminds me of the times I spent in Italy cooking with nonnas and their families. It was beautiful to see all the people involved in the production. The use of your hands to roll the dough into logs, cutting the gnocchi and rolling with a fork are all physical activities I enjoy. To me, the production of gnocchi from scratch is reminiscent to the way a sculptor would use clay to form and craft a piece of art. The utilization of freshly dug potatoes is the most inspiring and central component of this dish. My wife, Lindsay grew up in Maine where she would spend her summers harvesting new potatoes. I saw the connection of rosemary growing near the potatoes and felt it would make an excellent complement to their rich and creaminess. This recipe is highly adaptable and you can incorporate a number of ingredient variations. You could add clams or porcini mushrooms to the recipe and the use of rosemary could be replaced with another herb, however it best suits your taste.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 Pound russet potatoes
  • 1 1/2 Pound new crop German butterball potatoes
  • 3 1/2 Tablespoon butter
  • 1 Sprig rosemary
  • 1 Egg
  • 1 Egg yolk
  • 5 Tablespoon heavy cream
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 Cup all purpose flour

Preparation

Step 1:

Preheat oven to 375ºF. Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil. Cover a sheet pan with coarse salt and lay the potatoes on top.

Step 2:

Bake in the oven until tender and you are able to pierce with a kitchen knife.

Step 3:

While the potatoes are cooling, melt the butter with the sprig of rosemary and let the rosemary infuse the butter.

Step 4:

Peel both varieties of potatoes and pass through a fine blade of a food mill.

Step 5:

Place the milled potatoes in a bowl and make a well in the center. Add the melted butter, egg, egg yolk and heavy cream to the well. Mix together and season with salt to taste. Slightly over season the potato purée to compensate for the flour that will then be added.

Step 6:

Spread the flour on a work table and put the purée in the center.

Step 7:

Using a bench scraper cut the flour into the potato mixture until all the flour is absorbed. If the gnocchi is still a little moist add in a touch more flour.

Step 8:

Work from the bottom of the dough using the bench scraper, turn the gnocchi over once or twice (do not overwork the gnocchi). Test the gnocchi by pressing your index finger into the gnocchi. If the dough is too moist your finger will come out slightly sticky. If this occurs add a little more flour and fold the gnocchi over to absorb the flour. If your finger comes out dry you are ready to test the gnocchi.

Step 9:

Cut the gnocchi with the bench scraper and then roll into logs using both hands. Cut the gnocchi into small pieces and flour gently. If your gnocchi is a little moist add a pinch of flour and roll it into the dough while making the coils. Season the water with salt.

Step 10:

Cut the gnocchi with the bench scraper and then roll into logs using both hands. Cut the gnocchi into small pieces and flour gently. If your gnocchi is a little moist add a pinch of flour and roll it into the dough while making the coils. Season the water with salt.

Step 11:

Roll a fork over the gnocchi and then drop into the simmering water. When the gnocchi float they are ready to taste. Adjust the gnocchi if necessary and then roll and fork all the gnocchi. The gnocchi can be held in the refrigerator until ready to serve.