POLITICS

The Also-Rans: Where are they now?

You know them as the also-rans -- those colorful candidates who made a splash on the campaign trail, only to fade from the news after the election ended. These candidates may have tanked in the polls, but they certainly knew how to capture public attention. FoxNews.com takes a look at what these also-rans are doing now.

Jimmy McMillan

The founder of the Rent Is Too Damn High Party in New York first gained notoriety running for governor in 2010. With his all-too-recognizable mutton chops and memorable one-liners (like, "if you want to marry a shoe, I'll marry you"), he was a dynamic presence on the campaign trail and debate stage – though he did not win. McMillan returned this past year and tried to run for NYC mayor, but he was unable to gather enough signatures, so he endorsed Anthony Weiner in the Democratic primary.

AP

Stormy Daniels

An actress, screenwriter and director in the adult-film industry, Stormy Daniels flirted in 2010 with running as a Republican for the Louisiana U.S. Senate seat held by Republican Sen. David Vitter. In the end, the Baton Rouge native opted out of the primary and remains a working mom in the adult film industry.

AP

Alvin Greene

Alvin Greene’s 2010 Democratic primary victory in South Carolina baffled many, especially because Greene didn’t campaign or spend any money.  He was an unknown before his victory. He went on to lose -- big -- to then Republican incumbent Sen. Jim DeMint.  In August 2013, Greene was arrested on trespassing charges in Myrtle Beach, S.C.

AP

Roseanne Barr

Actress, comedian, writer and producer, Roseanne Barr announced her candidacy for president in the 2012 election on "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno." She ran as the nominee of the California-based Peace and Freedom Party. She actually came in sixth place, winning more than 48,000 votes. Barr continues to dip a toe in the world of politics; she recently flexed her First Amendment rights posting an open letter to Congress on her website roseanneworld.com “regarding blackmail from the Executive Branch” detailing President Obama’s “direct attacks against the 1st, 2nd 4th and 5th amendments to the Constitution.”

AP

Steve Berke

In 2011, then-comedian Steve Berke ran for mayor of Miami as a pro-nightclub member of the “After Party” with a pro-marijuana stance. Today, Berke refers to himself as an entertainer living off his YouTube channel. He ran again for mayor this year and, although he took a more serious approach, he came in third with 12 percent of the vote.

FNC

Jello Biafra

Since his days with the Dead Kennedys, Jello Biafra has been a political activist. In 1979, he ran for mayor of San Francisco with a platform that stated businessmen had to wear clown suits within city limits.  He came in fourth out of 10 candidates. In 2000, he tried to run for president with the Green Party, but Ralph Nader won the nomination. Biafra is still performing today, touring with his new-ish band, Jello Biafra and the Guantanamo School of Medicine. He also recently starred in a Hunger Games spoof, “The Hipster Games: Blowing Smoke.”

FNC

Luther "Luke" Campbell

Do you remember 2 Live Crew? The infamous, foul-mouthed rap group gained national attention back in 1989 when their album "As Nasty As They Wanna Be" was banned in Florida for violating obscenity laws. The ruling was overturned and in the process, the band became unlikely First Amendment advocates. Flash forward to 2011: Luther “Luke” Campbell, the former 2 Live Crew frontman, ran for mayor of Miami-Dade County with a platform that included taxing strippers. He lost the race but won 11 percent of the vote. Today Campbell is a certified high school football coach in the state of Florida and blogs regularly for the Miami New Times.

AP

The Also-Rans: Where are they now?

You know them as the also-rans -- those colorful candidates who made a splash on the campaign trail, only to fade from the news after the election ended. These candidates may have tanked in the polls, but they certainly knew how to capture public attention. FoxNews.com takes a look at what these also-rans are doing now.

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