POLITICS

RNC releases 1st Spanish-language TV ad – but it does not mention Donald Trump

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, in Pensacola, Fla. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016, in Pensacola, Fla. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)  (Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

The Republican National Committee has released its first Spanish-language television of the 2016 election. 

But the ad fails to mention one thing: Donald Trump.

With less than a week to go before Election Day, the RNC shelled out $250,000 on 30-second spots that do not show or mention the billionaire, which has struggled to attract Latino support. The ads instead focus on issues important to the Hispanic community: taxes, religious freedom and school choice. It will air on Univision and Telemundo, according to the Wall Street Journal.

“We need a government that benefits us,” Sofia Boza, the RNC's Hispanic media press secretary, said during the ad. “Vote Republican this Nov. 8.”

It is the first time the RNC has spent money on TV ads though it has run online videos in Spanish, the Journal said. The Trump campaign has not spent money on Spanish-language media while Hillary Clinton's campaign has spent millions on Latino outreach.

In a statement, RNC chairman Reince Priebus said: “Whether it’s fighting for low taxes, a strong national security, or religious freedom, our party is the only one with a vision for real change from the past eight years. While Democrats have spent years taking Hispanic voters for granted, we are offering a new direction that gives a voice to all Americans.”

The ad was also released in English.

The only pro-Trump, Spanish-language ads on television were released by a super PAC which including one showing Clinton barking like a dog with the narrator saying: “If you want the dog, accept the fleas.”

Clinton’s campaign has spent millions of dollars this year to target Hispanic voters across the country including spots specifically targeting Trump’s hardline stance on immigration. She debuted her first Spanish-language TV ad of the general election in September.

“This is another example of a lost opportunity,” Hector Barreto, a Republican serving as president of the Hispanic Business Roundtable Institute, told the Journal. “He either doesn’t care or believes he can win without Hispanic support. Next Tuesday he’ll learn the truth.”

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