Donald Trump hasn't publicity released his tax returns. The same can no longer be said of his running mate, Mike Pence.

The Republican vice presidential nominee and Indiana governor on Friday released a decade worth of returns, roughly a month after promising to do so. The campaign said Pence paid a state and federal tax rate that ranged between 10 percent and 16 percent over the past decade.

Pence's income topped out at $187,000 while he was still a member of Congress, but dropped to $113,000 last year. The family has donated 10 percent of their take-home pay to charity, the campaign said, which reflects an average 7.4 percent of their adjusted gross income.

"The Pence family has been honored to serve their state and their nation for the past 16 years, while raising three great children and putting them through college," said Marc Lotter, Pence's spokesman. "These tax returns clearly show that Mike and Karen Pence have paid their taxes, supported worthy causes, and, unlike the Clintons, the Pences have not profited from their years in public service."

Major-party presidential nominees have publicly released their taxes since 1976, but Trump is the exception. He has said he is waiting for the conclusion of an audit.

Last month, Hillary Clinton released her 2015 tax return, adding to the records dating to 1977 she previously made public. Her running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine, also released 10 years of tax returns last month.

"We're pleased to see that one member of the Trump ticket has decided to meet the long-held threshold for disclosure in a modern-day presidential campaign," said Christina Reynolds, the Clinton campaign's deputy communications director. "But it's Donald Trump — who just this week attacked America's generals and showered praise on Russia's authoritarian leader — running to be our next president."