POLITICS

U.S. immigration service tweets out wrong date of the Declaration of Independence

PHILADELPHIA - JULY 3:  An American flag flies over the building after the re-lighting of Independence Hall July 3, 2005 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For the first time in many years the American flag that flies over Independence Hall will be raised 24 hours a day due to the implementation of a new lighting system.  (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)

PHILADELPHIA - JULY 3: An American flag flies over the building after the re-lighting of Independence Hall July 3, 2005 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For the first time in many years the American flag that flies over Independence Hall will be raised 24 hours a day due to the implementation of a new lighting system. (Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)  (2005 Getty Images)

A tweet from the Spanish division of the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has caused a stir after it listed the incorrect year that the Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress.

On the social media site, the USCIS asked in Spanish what date the Declaration of Independence was and gave three choices: June 29, 1779, July 4, 1779 or July 4, 1778.

The correct answer in none of the ones listed, but instead is July 4, 1776.

USCIS says it quickly recognized the mistake and removed the tweet from its social media feed.

“It was a typo,” a USCIS spokesperson told Fox News Latino. “It was human error and the tweet was removed within the hour.”

Before the tweet was removed, however, it caught the eye of immigration hardliner Mark Krikorian, who quickly shared the USCIS’s post and his thoughts on the quiz.

“It’s such an elementary thing to know that it’s not a sign of normal fallibility,” Krikorian, the director of the Center for Immigration Studies, told FNL. “It’s a disturbing sign of the lack of familiarity with American history itself.”

Krikorian hounded the federal agency on Twitter asking things like “Should we really be taking 1M new immigrants a year when the agency in charge of making citizens gets *this* wrong?” and “Does this mean that if you take the citizenship test in Spanish the Declaration of Independence was adopted in 1779?”

Krikorian added that unlike President Barack Obama’s “57 states” comments or former President George W. Bush’s gaffes, the USCIS tweet did not come after many hours of speaking off the cuff but was an official tweet.

“This isn’t that kind of thing,” he said. “It really is alarming.”

Follow Andrew O'Reilly on Twitter @aoreilly84.

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