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Fox News Latino Live Blog

Republican presidential candidates, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., businessman Donald Trump, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Ohio Gov. John Kasich take the stage before a Republican presidential primary debate at Fox Theatre, Thursday, March 3, 2016, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Republican presidential candidates, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., businessman Donald Trump, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Ohio Gov. John Kasich take the stage before a Republican presidential primary debate at Fox Theatre, Thursday, March 3, 2016, in Detroit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Dirty Water

Marco Rubio slammed Democrats for "politicizing" the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, but failed to lay out any concrete ideas for preventing similar issues in the future.

Flint’s Hispanic community – 4 percent of its population, according to U.S. Census data – had a great deal of trouble following the water crisis. Many undocumented immigrants living in the city were afraid to go to water distribution centers after some were turned away for not having a driver's license or valid identification card. There were also widespread reports that many Spanish-speakers in the Flint area were unaware of the crisis because there was little information available in their native language.

Also, many undocumented immigrants in Flint refused to open their doors to volunteers going house-to-house, because they were afraid they were the target of an immigration raid. Churches began doubling as distribution centers because they were the only places immigrants were comfortable going without fear of deportation.

Release the tape, Donald

The issue of an off-the-record conversation Trump held with the New York Times editorial board kept coming back to the Detroit stage.

Rubio and especially Cruz repeatedly demanded Trump authorizes the Times to disclose the audio that, they say, would show the American people he is not being truthful about what his real deportation plans. Trump didn’t concede, saying all candidates talk with reporters off the record and privacy should be honored.

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Two Davids and one Goliath

Once Rubio and Trump were done discussing anatomy and exchanging insults, it was Ted Cruz’s turn in the ring. He battered the billionaire kind of relentlessly when he questioned his GOP core asking him to explain how come he supported Carter, not Reagan, and Kerry, not Bush back then – and most importantly, Cruz said he wanted to know why he had issued 10 checks to Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaigns, four of them during the 2008 contest.

Trump response was indirect: “Look,” he said, “the last person Hillary Clinton wants to run against is me.”

In case you didn’t know, Trump wants Mexico to pay for the wall

When questioned by Megyn Kelly about his immigration stance, Donald Trump said that “in terms of immigration or anything else, there’s always going to be some tug and pull.”

But when it comes to immigration he’s “not very flexible.”

Oh, and yeah, he would build a wall. But he’s flexible on the height.

Rubio defends going personal; Trump defends hand size

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio defended his personal attacks on Donald Trump’s hand size and his bladder by saying that the real estate mogul has run his campaign on personally attacking everyone.

“Donald Trump has basically mocked everybody with personal attacks,” Rubio said. “If there’s anyone deserved to be attacked it’s Donald Trump.”

In response, Trump held his hands in the air: “Look at these hands, are these small hands?”

"I guarantee you there's no problem," he then said, prompting a general laughter.

Hey candidates, welcome to 'Mexicantown'

The countdown is on for tonight’s Fox News GOP Debate in Detroit, a city that has seen its population plummet from over 1 million in 1990 to just over 688,000 today. There is, however, one exception to the rule.

Latinos are moving to Motown in record numbers, with the Hispanic population growing by 70 percent, from 28,473 in 1990 to 48,679, according to the 2010 Census. Just 4 miles from where the candidates stand on stage is a section of southwestern Detroit, nicknamed “Mexicantown.” Its main thoroughfares are lined with Mexican restaurants, markets, clubs and murals of Latino rights activists like Cesar Chavez.

And with the city experiencing a mass exodus, Latinos have seen their influence grow – from 5 to about 7 percent of the city’s overall population.

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