POLITICS

Ted Cruz reintroduces legislation to crack down on sanctuary cities

  • DES MOINES, IA - SEPTEMBER 19:  Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) speaks at the Iowa Faith & Freedom Coalition 15th Annual Family Banquet and Presidential Forum held at the Iowa State fairgrounds on September 19, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa.  Eight of the Republican candidates including Donald Trump are expected to attend the event. (Photo by Steve Pope/Getty Images)

    DES MOINES, IA - SEPTEMBER 19: Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) speaks at the Iowa Faith & Freedom Coalition 15th Annual Family Banquet and Presidential Forum held at the Iowa State fairgrounds on September 19, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa. Eight of the Republican candidates including Donald Trump are expected to attend the event. (Photo by Steve Pope/Getty Images)  (2015 Getty Images)

  • DES MOINES, IA - SEPTEMBER 19:  Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) speaks at the Iowa Faith & Freedom Coalition 15th Annual Family Banquet and Presidential Forum held at the Iowa State fairgrounds on September 19, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa.  Eight of the Republican candidates including Donald Trump are expected to attend the event. (Photo by Steve Pope/Getty Images)

    DES MOINES, IA - SEPTEMBER 19: Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) speaks at the Iowa Faith & Freedom Coalition 15th Annual Family Banquet and Presidential Forum held at the Iowa State fairgrounds on September 19, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa. Eight of the Republican candidates including Donald Trump are expected to attend the event. (Photo by Steve Pope/Getty Images)  (2015 Getty Images)

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz renewed his fight on Wednesday to pass a bill that would crack down on so-called "sanctuary cities" throughout the U.S., after similar legislation was shot down on Senate floor earlier in the week.

Cruz reintroduced the bill and placed it directly on the Senate calendar in an attempt for the legislation to be called up and voted on immediately.

"The policies of the Obama administration and sanctuary jurisdictions across our country are inexcusable, and they are a threat to the safety of the American people," Cruz said in a press release. "For months, I have been pressing for a standalone vote on Kate's Law. This time, I filed the legislation on the Senate floor so it is available on the calendar to be pulled up directly."

Cruz and other supporters of the legislation refer to the bill, the Establishing Mandatory Minimums for Illegal Reentry Act of 2015, as Kate's Law — a reference to Kathryn Steinle, who was killed over the summer by an undocumented immigrant who had been released by San Francisco authorities despite a request from federal immigration authorities to keep him detained.  

Detractors of the legislation call it the Donald Trump Bill, after the real estate mogul's inflammatory comments earlier this summer about immigrants.

Elements of Kate's Law were incorporated in Louisiana Sen. David Vitter's Stop Sanctuary Policies and Protect Americans Act that fell six votes short of passing the Senate during a procedural vote on Tuesday. The law would have punished jurisdictions that prohibit the collection of immigration information or don't cooperate with federal requests, blocking them from receiving certain grants and funds.

Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid said before the vote earlier this week that the bill would threaten cities' ability to police and compared it to Republican presidential candidate Trump's comments that some immigrants in the country illegally are "criminals" and "rapists."

"This vile legislation might as well be called 'The Donald Trump Act'," Reid said.

San Francisco and hundreds of other jurisdictions nationally have adopted policies of disregarding federal immigration requests, or "detainers," which advocates say can unfairly target innocent people and hurt relations between immigrant communities and law enforcement authorities.

The House passed legislation similar to Vitter's bill this summer, which the White House also threatened to veto. In its veto threat of the Senate legislation, the White House said the bill could lead to mistrust between the federal government and local governments.

The Obama administration has said that the best way to get at the problem is comprehensive immigration overhaul, something House Republicans have blocked for years.

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