Another Wisconsin family has come forward saying they were subject to a secret home invasion because of their support for Gov. Scott Walker.

In April, National Review reported accounts from three women who said they were subject to terrifying and sometimes violent pre-dawn raids, because of their support for Walker when he battled the state’s public unions. National Review reported another account Monday, this time from a 16-year-old boy who was home alone when the police showed up with a warrant and their guns drawn.

The boy opened the door, the police read him the warrant and then ransacked his house. The warrant was related to a massive but secret “John Doe” investigation of Scott Walker for alleged campaign violations — his father was roped in because he is a prominent Wisconsin conservative and political consultant suspected of illegally colluding with Walker.

The boy was told he could not tell his parents about the raid or talk to a lawyer or anyone else about the search. “John Doe” proceedings allow Wisconsin authorities to conduct broad but secret investigations into criminal activity.

Walker’s been scrutinized in two separate “John Doe” investigations covering his time as a county executive and his gubernatorial campaigns, and extending to a conservative groups that fought for him against unions in 2012.

Neither investigation has turned up any concrete evidence and years after that secret raid the boy’s family has not been charged with a crime.

A court shut down the first investigation, and a ruling is expected soon on the merits of the second, which deals with allegations Walker’s campaign illegally coordinated with conservative groups working to reelect him in 2012 and 2014. (RELATED: Politico Suggests National Media Will Trump Up Fruitless Walker Investigation)

“We’re so fortunate that he’s okay,” his mother told National Review. “He could have been in the shower. They could have broken the door down. He could have been shot. Over politics.”

Their identities were kept secret by National Review, as were the identities of two of the three women whose similar accounts National Review reported in April. (RELATED: Wisconsin Police Violently Invade Homes Of Thought Criminals, AKA Conservatives)

The boy now has a “deep sense” he’s not safe in his home, and suffers strong anxiety when a car approaches the driveway, he told National Review. And his family is less politically active, more guarded in conversation, and less trusting of police.

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