The Hillary Clinton campaign’s “Dinner With Hillary” contest has slightly different fine print than past Clinton campaign contests. The rules have been altered so as not to explicitly exclude illegal immigrants from entering.

As The Daily Caller reported, the Clinton campaign’s “Meet Hillary” contest, which closed for entries June 5, prohibited DREAMers from entering or winning prizes.

“Promotion open only to U.S. citizens, or lawful permanent U.S. residents who are legal residents of the 50 states, DC or Puerto Rico and 18 or older (or age of majority under applicable law),” according to that contest’s fine print.

But the new “Dinner With Hillary” contest, which closes for entries July 30, is open to citizens and non-citizens alike.

“PROMOTION OPEN ONLY TO INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE UNITED STATES CITIZENS OR WHO RESIDE IN THE FIFTY (50) UNITED STATES, PUERTO RICO OR DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA AND ARE OVER THE AGE OF 18 (OR THE AGE OF MAJORITY UNDER APPLICABLE LAW),” according to the new contest’s fine print.

Did you catch that? The concept is open to citizens “OR” individuals who reside in the United States, D.C., or Puerto Rico. But NOTHING about “legal residents” or “lawful permanent U.S. residents,” like the previous contest.

TheDC has reached out to the Clinton campaign regarding these contest eligibility rules.

“The Promotion and these Official Rules will be governed, construed and interpreted under the laws of the State of New York without regard to its or any other jurisdiction’s choice of law provisions,” according to another passage of the fine print. “Entrants agree to be bound by these Official Rules and by the decisions of Sponsor, which are final and binding in all respects.”

The contest saddles its winners with a series of costs and taxes.

“Except as expressly set forth in the description of above, winner and his or her guest are responsible for ground transportation to and from the airports and hotel, all other meals and all other expenses that winner and his or her guest incur in connection with the Prize,” according to the rules.

The approximate retail value of the prize is $1,900, which means that middle-income winners will be forced to pay $475 in taxes on their winnings.

Follow Howley on Twitter