Threats

Secret Service agent to retire ahead of report into White House incident

March 19, 2015: Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy testifies before a Senate Appropriations Homeland Security Subcommittee hearing on the Secret Service FY2016 budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Reuters)

March 19, 2015: Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy testifies before a Senate Appropriations Homeland Security Subcommittee hearing on the Secret Service FY2016 budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Reuters)

A top Secret Service agent who worked on President Obama’s security detail and was being investigated for allegedly crashing into a White House security barrier is retiring, agency officials told Fox News Wednesday.

Marc Connolly, a former second-in-command on Obama’s security detail, was being investigated along with fellow agent George Ogilvie for the March 4 incident in which the pair allegedly drove a government car into a security barrier near the White House and onto an active crime scene where a suspicious item was being investigated.

Connolly's retirement comes ahead of an upcoming report from the inspector general’s office into the incident and a hearing Thursday before the House Oversight Committee.

The Washington Post reported Wednesday that the inspector general's investigation concluded the two agents were likely impaired by alcohol when the incident occurred, having spent five hours at a bar racking up a large tab with two colleagues at a work party.

The investigation found that Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy “acted appropriately upon receiving information about potential misconduct,” and found no evidence that suggested that a video of the incident was deleted or destroyed intentionally, officials told Fox News.

“The Secret Service takes allegations of employee misconduct very seriously,” Clancy said in a statement.

“I am disappointed and disturbed at the apparent lack of judgement described in this report. Behavior of the type described in the report is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Our mission is too important,” Clancy said.

Both agents had been placed on administrative leave, officials said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.