POLITICS

Latinos more likely to oppose legalizing marijuana than the overall U.S. population, study finds

DALY CITY, CA - APRIL 18:  A bowl of medicinal marijuana is displayed in a booth at The International Cannabis and Hemp Expo April 18, 2010 at the Cow Palace in Daly City, California. The two day Cannabis and Hemp Expo features speakers, retailers selling medical marijuana smoking paraphernalia and a special tent available for medical marijuana card holders to smoke their medicine. Voters in California will consider a measure on the November general election ballot that could make the State the first in the nation to legalize the growing of a limited amount of marijuana for private use. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

DALY CITY, CA - APRIL 18: A bowl of medicinal marijuana is displayed in a booth at The International Cannabis and Hemp Expo April 18, 2010 at the Cow Palace in Daly City, California. The two day Cannabis and Hemp Expo features speakers, retailers selling medical marijuana smoking paraphernalia and a special tent available for medical marijuana card holders to smoke their medicine. Voters in California will consider a measure on the November general election ballot that could make the State the first in the nation to legalize the growing of a limited amount of marijuana for private use. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)  (2010 Getty Images)

With marijuana initiatives up for vote on ballots in a number of states, advocates of liberalizing marijuana laws won't be able to rely on the Latino vote to help them out on Nov. 4, a new study found.

The study, conducted by the Pew Research Center, indicates that Latinos are more likely than white or black voters to oppose decriminalizing marijuana. When asked whether pot should be legalized, 49 percent of registered Latino voters answered yes, while 48 percent said otherwise. 

That is compared to 53 percent of the overall U.S. population favoring legalization against 44 percent who do not.

But it isn't exactly a sweeping anti-pot sentiment from the Latino community.

When asked whether they supported legalizing marijuana for medicinal purposes only, or for personal recreational use as well, the results were very different.

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About eight-in-ten Latino registered voters responded that marijuana should be legal in some form, with 47 percent supporting medicinal legalization only and 34 percent supporting legalization for personal use as well. 

In terms of the rest of the U.S. population, 38 percent of whites and 43 percent of blacks supporting legalization of marijuana for medicinal use only, and 43 percent of whites and 41 percent of blacks favor legalizing it for personal use as well.

The study also found that foreign-born Latinos in the U.S. are far less likely to support marijuana legalization than Hispanics born in the United States, with only 27 percent of the immigrants favoring legalization compared to the 57 percent of those born here.

Overall, Latinos are also less likely to have tried marijuana, with 33 percent of Hispanic respondents saying they have compared to 50 percent of whites and 49 percent of blacks.

Proposals for recreational marijuana use are on the ballot in Alaska, Oregon and Washington, D.C., with medical-marijuana measures up for vote in the territory of Guam and the Latino-heavy state of Florida.

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