POLITICS

Pentagon Considering Allowing Undocumented Immigrants To Enter Military Service

SPINBOLDAK, AFGHANISTAN - JANUARY 29:  U.S. soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division provide cover for a search operation being conducted January 29, 2003 in Spinboldak, southeastern Afghanistan, during Operation Devil Impact. A U.S. military spokesman said the soldiers found stashes of cooking oil, food, boots and rockets January 30 in caves high in a southeastern Afghan mountain, evidence a hostile group may have been using the complex as a supply hub.  (Photo by Dennis Steele/U.S. Army/Getty Images)

SPINBOLDAK, AFGHANISTAN - JANUARY 29: U.S. soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division provide cover for a search operation being conducted January 29, 2003 in Spinboldak, southeastern Afghanistan, during Operation Devil Impact. A U.S. military spokesman said the soldiers found stashes of cooking oil, food, boots and rockets January 30 in caves high in a southeastern Afghan mountain, evidence a hostile group may have been using the complex as a supply hub. (Photo by Dennis Steele/U.S. Army/Getty Images)  (2003 Getty Images)

The Pentagon is weighing allowing some immigrants brought illegally to the country as youths to serve in the military, a unilateral step by the Obama administration as immigration legislation remains stalled in the Republican-led House.

The Pentagon consideration would apply to immigrants who arrived illegally as kids but already have received work permits and relief from deportation under a program President Barack Obama announced two years ago, called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. More than 500,000 immigrants have benefited from the program.

The Defense Department "continues to examine the laws and policies that address the eligibility of noncitizens to serve in the military in order to determine if and how our programs could be applied to DACA recipients," Pentagon spokesman Lt. Cmdr. Nate Christensen said in a statement.

Such a move by the Pentagon would be the latest example of the Obama administration taking incremental steps by executive action on immigration with comprehensive overhaul legislation stuck in the GOP-led House 11 months after passage by the Senate. Obama is coming under pressure to make broader moves on executive action as the likelihood grows that the House will not pass any immigration bill this year.

The announcement came Tuesday as House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, defended his election-year decision to rebuff a narrow immigration measure pushed by a GOP congressman to achieve a similar goal. Boehner told reporters that a national defense bill was not the place for a vote on California Rep. Jeff Denham's measure offering citizenship to immigrants here illegally who serve in the military.

"We have supported it in the past but trying to do this on the national defense authorization bill seems to us be an inappropriate place to do it," Boehner said. 

Despite the opposition, Denham testified before the House Rules Committee several hours after Boehner spoke. "There is no better way to show your patriotism, your commitment, your sacrifice and the willingness to earn that citizenship than being able to serve in our military," Denham said.

Denham's bill – which was co-sponsored by 50 House members, Democrats and Republicans – would allow immigrants who were brought to this country on or before Dec. 31, 2011, and were younger than 15 years old to become legal, permanent residents, the first step toward citizenship, through honorable service in the military. It would apply to a broader group of people than those who've received deferred action from the Obama administration, but Denham told reporters he would welcome any move by the Pentagon on its own.

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