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Clinton delivers big hit with tweet, but who was target? Obama or Fox News?

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Super Bowl chips and dip apparently weren’t enough to satisfy former secretary of state — and possible Democratic presidential contender — Hillary Clinton, who took to social media during the big game to take a curious Twitter shot, though at who seems unclear.

“It’s so much more fun to watch Fox when it’s someone else being blitzed & sacked! #SuperBowl,” Clinton tweeted after Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly’s pre-game one-on-one with President Obama.

Whether “blitzed & sacked” referred to O’Reilly’s questioning of the president or Clinton’s view of how Obama handled himself during the interview is open to interpretation.

The website BuzzFeed called the tweet “a dig at Fox,” while the conservative-leaning Business Insider called it a “huge snipe” at the network.

On the other hand, the obviously right-leaning website Conservative Monster appeared to see it the other way, asking, “Was Hillary Clinton’s mysterious Super Bowl Tweet ‘joy’ that Obama was on the Fox ‘Hot Seat’?”


Clinton press secretary Nick Merrill told reporters the tweet, which by Monday morning had been re-tweeted more than 54,000 times, was “good-natured, light-hearted and self-deprecating.”

Still, while Fox News has been at the forefront of reporting on the deadly Sept., 11, 2012, terror attack on a U.S. outpost in Benghazi, Libya, that left four Americans dead, including Ambassador Chris Stevens, other news organizations have put Clinton under the magnifying glass.

The New York Times, for instance, was the first to assign a reporter to the Hillary Clinton beat amid early speculation about a 2016 candidacy. And in August 2013, the liberal-leaning newspaper delivered a story critical of the Clinton Foundation.

And while Clinton served as secretary of state for all of Obama’s first term, their battle for the 2008 Democratic nomination often turned nasty, with Clinton openly and often questioning Obama’s lack of experience in debates and campaign ads.