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Need for Speed: Md. candidate for governor ordered troopers to break traffic laws

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July 17, 2013: Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler, candidate for Maryland governor, chats with festival-goers in Crisfield, Md.AP

Maryland's top law enforcement official apparently isn't too fond of his own state's traffic laws. 

Doug Gansler, the Maryland attorney general and a top Democratic candidate for governor, reportedly was a bossy and reckless passenger while being driven around by state troopers. According to a report in The Washington Post, he ordered troopers to speed and run red lights while driving him to routine appointments as attorney general. 

The accusations were contained in Maryland State Police documents obtained by the Post. 

In one case, Gansler insisted on driving himself, running red lights with sirens blaring. 

Police Lt. Charles Ardolini wrote in 2011 that the "extremely irresponsible behavior" had been going on for five years and "occurs on a daily basis." 

"Attorney General Gansler has consistently acted in a way that disregards public safety, our Troopers safety and even the law," the memo said. 

The attorney general is in a tight Democratic primary race with Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and several other candidates, in which the winner would be considered the favorite in the Democratic-leaning state's 2014 general election. 

Gansler's campaign issued a response Sunday, in which the candidate apologized if his "backseat driving" made troopers uncomfortable. The campaign also said the matters were settled and are now being used as a political attack. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.