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Venezuelan president reportedly urges Snowden to decide on asylum

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro called on National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden to decide if he wants to seek refuge in his country after the American reportedly sent an asylum request to Caracas.

Maduro told reporters at a press conference on Monday that the fugitive systems analyst must communicate his intent to accept Venezuela's offer of asylum, The Wall Street Journal reported.

"He will have to say when he is flying here, if he definitely wants to come here," Maduro was quoted as telling reporters.

Snowden has applied for asylum in more than two dozen countries, including Bolivia, Nicaragua and Venezuela, according to WikiLeaks, the secret-spilling website that has been advising him.

Snowden is believed to be stranded in the transit area of Moscow's Sheremetyevo Airport since arriving on a flight from Hong Kong two weeks ago. He has been unable to travel further because the U.S. annulled his passport.

Venezuelan Foreign Minister Elias Jaua said Saturday his country hasn't yet been in contact with Snowden but that officials would wait until Monday for a signal from him, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Jaua didn't state what would happen if there was no response from Snowden and Maduro didn't comment on Monday's apparent, self-declared deadline, according to the report.

Over the weekend, both Venezuela and Bolivia made asylum offers to Snowden, and Nicaragua has said it is also considering his request.

The newspaper reported that Maduro on Monday called the offers from the Latin American countries as "collective humanitarian political asylum" offers.

Snowden claimed in a video released Monday, filmed by The Guardian in June, that the NSA gathers all communications into and out of the U.S. for analysis, despite NSA claims that it only targets foreign traffic.

Snowden also said NSA chief Gen. Keith Alexander lied to Congress by saying the agency could not determine how many U.S. communications are gathered — something Snowden says NSA auditing tool Boundless Informant does.

NSA did not directly answer the question, referring to an Alexander speech in which he talked about how the NSA fit into the larger counterterror team of the administration. Alexander has also said such data gathered by NSA programs can only be analyzed when linked to foreign targets.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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