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DNC chair won't condemn Priorities ad, though she wanted Romney to condemn Rush

 

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, declined this past weekend to condemn a super PAC ad that suggested Mitt Romney was to blame for a woman's death, though Wasserman Schultz recently had chided Romney for not condemning Rush Limbaugh’s nasty name calling.

Wasserman Schultz, when asked on “Fox News Sunday” whether Priorities USA should have released such an ad, responded, “That's a Priorities USA -- that’s not a Democratic ad.”

“We have nothing to do with that,” she continued.

In February, Limbaugh, a conservative radio host, called Georgetown University law student Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute” after she testified on Capitol Hill in support of a new Obama administration rule requiring employers to offer insurance plans that cover birth control.

“The bottom line is, the leading candidate on the Republican side for president couldn’t even bring himself to call Rush Limbaugh’s comments outrageous and call him out and ask him to apologize,” Wasserman Schultz said in March on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

The Priorities USA ad, released last week, features ex-steelworker Joe Soptic recounting how his wife died of cancer after he lost his health insurance when his plant was shuttered after a takeover by Bain Capital and other companies working with the private equity firm. 

However, it left out key details about the timeline, including that Soptic's wife died five years after the plant closed, and years after Romney left Bain. 

Priorities USA was started last year by Bill Burton, a 2008 Obama campaign staffer and Obama White House spokesman, and Sean Sweeney, an Obama administration political aide.

 

However, Wasserman said on Fox, “I have no idea of the political affiliation of folks who are associated with that Super PAC.” And she argued the ad points out that such decisions made by Bain Capital and others have consequences that “impacted people's lives in a significant way.”