The presidential campaign's political war of words over gas prices and who will lower them will surely escalate as President Obama hits the road next week for a series of energy-related speeches.

Perhaps the most notable among them will be a visit to the Cushing, Oklahoma-area, where Canadian company TransCanada is set to install an oil pipeline that will begin there and reach the Gulf of Mexico. The president will make remarks at a storage yard holding pipes that will be used for the pipeline's construction.

The president's visit appears to be intended to be an exclamation point for a White House constantly defending the president as pro-U.S. drilling.

It will likely take more convincing for many in the GOP, however, given the fierce debate with the president over that same company's request for an oil pipeline that would traverse the US-Canada border. The issue became mired in politics and resulted in the president's rejection of the plan.

As gas prices continue to rise, both sides are not letting up on the issue, each hoping their message with resonate with voters.

The president this week accused his rivals of failing to have an open mind on energy diversification, comparing them to those who thought the world was flat.

Republican presidential candidate and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich shot back that not only does he support energy diversification, but he feels the president prefers Saudi oil to U.S. oil.

The president has been hammering the message of late that he has an "all of the above" approach to energy, which focuses on more than just oil. To illustrate that, Mr. Obama will use a variety of backdrops next week, beginning on Wednesday in Nevada, where he'll head to the largest solar panel facility in the country, and on to New Mexico later that day, where he'll visit oil and gas production fields housed on federal lands.

On Thursday, the president will visit the Cushing facility as well as stop by Ohio State University's advanced energy-related research and development facility.