President Obama has capped off a week full of new executive actions with yet a few more Friday, when he announced efforts intended to help American businesses.

The president has been in a bitter struggle with Congress in recent weeks over their failure to pass his American Jobs Act, which at this point is dead in the water.

So, the president has released a flurry of government actions this week intended to influence policy and doesn't require their approval.

It was a move seen by some in the GOP as a government power grab.

Congressman Paul Ryan (R-WI) said Wednesday, "Forget about the intention of the reforms or even the objects of the reforms. This is just one more example of the executive branch effectively taking over the law-making power of the legislative branch."

Mr. Obama's directives released Friday call on government agencies to streamline the process for federal research to turn into commercial products, potentially allowing companies to create jobs more quickly. He also called for the creation of the BusinessUSA website, to be in operation within 90 days, that will allow businesses to more easily find information on federal services.

The technology transfer memorandum directs federal agencies with research laboratories that deal with issues such as inventions and patent licenses to measure and better track the results of their work.

White House officials say at this point, these agencies do not track job creation. They hope that with this memorandum they will be able to assess those figures.

Mr. Obama's executive actions have been dubbed, "We Can't Wait," highlighting Congress' rejection of the president's jobs bill. The president insists the actions are not intended to supplant the bill.

The actions are intended to either update or speed up current regulations and laws in order to try to front-load the benefit. Previous actions have dealt with housing, veterans and students.

Still, some of the regulations don't pack a big punch. In one case, the president merely called for groups competing for government grants to step up hiring on their own. However, some members of Congress read the president's moves as asserting increased executive power.

White House officials insist Friday's announcement was coordinated with the business community. "I think it came to us very clearly from the Jobs Council and others to say, 'this is the next logical step'-- to have this outside looking in perspective and start to roll up this content and these deliverables on behalf of American businesses in one place," US Chief Information Officer VanRoekel told reporters.

The White House says they plan to announce new executive actions each week.