POLITICS

Alabama's Latino Community Urges Spanish Speakers to Miss Work

FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2011 photo, college student Jasmine Oliver, of Warwick, R.I., top left, and Javier Gonzalez, of Pawtucket, R.I., top right, display a banner and shout their support for allowing illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition rates while attending public colleges in the state, during a Board of Governors of Higher Education meeting on the campus of the Community College of Rhode Island, in Warwick, R.I. But research varies on the effects of resident tuition rates for illegal immigrants, including on enrollment, and students may still face a tough road even if they graduate with a college degree: Without passage of the DREAM Act or other federal immigration reform, illegal immigrant students have no pathway to legal status, and it remains illegal for employers to hire them. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

FILE - In this Sept. 26, 2011 photo, college student Jasmine Oliver, of Warwick, R.I., top left, and Javier Gonzalez, of Pawtucket, R.I., top right, display a banner and shout their support for allowing illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition rates while attending public colleges in the state, during a Board of Governors of Higher Education meeting on the campus of the Community College of Rhode Island, in Warwick, R.I. But research varies on the effects of resident tuition rates for illegal immigrants, including on enrollment, and students may still face a tough road even if they graduate with a college degree: Without passage of the DREAM Act or other federal immigration reform, illegal immigrant students have no pathway to legal status, and it remains illegal for employers to hire them. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)  (AP2011)

Take the day off – to protest the harsh laws targeting undocumented immigrants in Alabama.

That's what some in the state's Latino community are encouraging Spanish-speaking residents to do, all to counter Alabama's efforts to fight against illegal immigration.

Facebook users have formed groups and events urging people to skip work on Wednesday and Thursday. They're also asking people to only shop at businesses that are part of the Hispanic community. Hundreds have said they're participating.

A Spanish-language radio station in metro Birmingham is helping promote the campaign. It's telling fans on its Facebook page to stage a labor strike to show that Hispanics are an important part of Alabama's economy.

In heavily Hispanic Albertville, city officials say some Hispanic businesses are planning to close Wednesday. The city is considering a parade permit request so people can demonstrate against the law.

Based on reporting by The Associated Press.

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