The State of the Union is over, and it's pretty safe to assume that we've gone back to partisan seating on Capitol Hill.

What a difference a day makes. We've gone from, "There are no cooties to be had between Republicans and Democrats," from Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, on Wednesday morning, to a media availability by Senate Democrats at 12:30 p.m. ET on Thursday that will, according to the press release, "unveil an initial estimate of the jobs impact of the House Republicans' extreme, ideological plans for the federal budget."

Several hot button items from the president's address will be on the Congressional agenda for Wednesday.

The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) releases an updated budget and economic outlook for the fiscal years 2011-2021. The report reflects the impact of the tax cut compromise passed during December's lame duck session, and will include new deficit projections for the years ahead.

Budget Committee Democrats Sen. Kent Conrad of North Dakota and Rep. Chris Van Hollen of Maryland give their interpretation of the numbers at a 1:30 p.m. ET news conference.

Senate Republicans led by Orrin Hatch of Utah unveil a Balanced Budget Amendment to the Constitution at noon. The proposed amendment would require Congress to pass a balanced budget and institute a two-thirds majority threshold for deficit spending or tax increases.

House Republicans hold a pair of hearings on the economic and regulatory effects of the new health care law. The Ways and Means Committee hears about the measure's economic impact and regulatory requirements from the White House's Council of Economic Advisers Chairman Austan Goolsbee and others at 9:00 a.m. ET. House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., the man tasked with delivering Wednesday night's GOP response, investigates the federal fiscal repercussions of the overhaul law at 10:00 a.m. ET.

One topic in Wednesday's address that could receive bipartisan support in Congress is education reform. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and Sen. Joe Lieberman, I-Conn., make the push at an 11:15 a.m. ET newser to reauthorize a program that offers vouchers for low-income Washington, DC residents to attend local private schools. Supporters say it gives children an alternative to the District's underperforming school system. Critics contend that the plan takes sorely needed money away from public schools.

We'll be covering all these stories and more, so stay with Fox News for all the latest.