President Obama delivers his second State of the Union address in the House Chamber at 9:00 p.m. ET.

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., will present the official Republican response afterwards.

Tea Party favorite Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., will share her own rebuttal to the president's message immediately following Mr. Ryan's remarks.

Before the evening's address, members will "pre-act" to the president's anticipated message, and promptly switch over to reacting once the speech ends. We'll have bicameral, bipartisan coverage and analysis all day.

Before hearing about Obama's plans for the budget, the Republican-controlled House is set to vote on a resolution to reduce non-security spending to fiscal year 2008 levels "or less." The measure is expected to pass handily.

House Democrats and Republicans hold separate closed-door meetings at 9:00 a.m. ET to solidify each party's message for the big day. Republican leaders hold a press conference after their session ends. Democrats may do the same.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., engage in some presidential address "pre-action" and lay out their party's agenda for the week at back-to-back media availabilities in the afternoon.

In one of the most important and revolutionary developments in Washington policy, Sens. Mark Udall, D-Colo., and Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, along with Reps. Heath Shuler, D-N.C., and Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., hold an 11:00 a.m. ET news conference on their efforts to end the practice of partisan seating at the State of the Union address. Many members have already enthusiastically announced their "dates" from the other party for the president's speech. Political prognosticators have talked about what the new arrangements may do to increase "civility" in Washington. Whether sitting in a different chair is able to change the tone in the nation's capital is still uncertain, but one thing is for sure: the standing ovations that have become commonplace at the State of the Union will look different than in years past.

9/11 first responders present a signed American flag to Rep. Gabrielle Giffords', D-Ariz., Congressional office at 4:00 p.m. ET. Giffords is currently in Houston, Texas recovering from a gunshot wound to the head she received during a mass shooting at a "Congress on Your Corner" event in Tucson, Arizona on January 8.

Daniel Hernandez, an intern for Rep. Giffords who tended to her wounds in the immediate aftermath of the incident, will attend the State of the Union address with first lady Michelle Obama. Members of Giffords' medical team from the University of Arizona will also be present for the speech.

It's going to be a busy day on the Hill, so be sure to stay with Fox News for all the latest developments.