A bill is headed to President Obama's desk Friday that will keep taxes at bay for millions of Americans, but whether you call them the "Bush tax cuts" or "Obama's tax deal" depends on how you feel about them.

It all began in 2001 when President George W. Bush pushed temporary tax cuts through Congress. Without the two-thirds majority needed to make them permanent, those cuts were due to expire at the end of this year. The debate over extending them became an exercise in strategic labeling.

Democrats concerned about the cuts which appealed to higher-income brackets chose to decry the "Bush tax cuts". The reference didn't sit well with the former commander in chief, who told conservative radio host Scott Hennen, "Well, I wish they would have called it something other than the Bush tax cuts and therefore would have been less angst amongst some to pass it."

But President Obama, who likes some provisions and not others, is comfortable using the Bush moniker.

"For the next two years, every American family will keep their tax cuts -- not just the Bush tax cuts, but those that have been put in place over the last couple of years that are helping parents and students and other folks manage their bills," the president said earlier this month.

Some have taken to simply referring to the provisions they like; noting, for example, the "middle class tax cuts" that were passed just in time for the holidays. Others lament the "give-away" for the rich that they say is taking place.For DNC Chairman Tim Kaine, the final package amounted to nothing short of "President Obama's Middle Class Tax Cut Agreement."