From walking the streets to working the phones, both Republicans and Democrats are working overtime to get out the vote in California. The California GOP says it's going the grassroots route with more than 30,000 volunteers on hand.

"We're knocking on doors, we're making phone calls, we're contacting people through social media, we're giving people an opportunity to choose a direction that they can best reach voters," said Brian Seitchik, spokesperson for the California GOP.

Democrats are also reaching out via phonebanks, canvassing neighborhoods, along with taking advantage of social media. Young Democrats are using sites like Facebook, Twitter and youtube, sponsoring contests where students make their own political ads.

"I think that it's made it a lot easier for young people to become in politics and to get the word out to a younger generation that normally wouldn't be exposed to political efforts or candidates or anything like that through facebook and social media, " says Megan Currier, an intern with the California Democrats.Pollsters say that in the blue leaning Golden state 'get out the vote' efforts will benefit Democrats more than Republicans .

"The Democratic electorate as a whole tends to be an electorate that sometimes will vote and sometimes doesn't vote. They have to have a reason to vote and so i think the Democrats rely on get out the vote efforts more than Republicans because we have to... the Democrats have to, " said Darry Sragow, the interim director of the USC- L.A. Times poll.

Sragow says their polling has found that many voters feel California is headed in the wrong direction and feel disappointed. He says that suggestsvoter turnout may be low this year.

That could be good news for Republicans, who are outnumbered by registered Democratic voters by more than two million.

"Republicans are going to come out and vote in big numbers, relatively speaking. Democrats, the fear is on the part of Democrats, they'll stay home, theyre curled up in the fetal position, they're going to stay home, " said Sragow.

Early voting shows that already a million votes have been cast in California. More than 42 percent are Democrats and almost 40 percent are Republicans.