Anthrax Letter Scientist 'Obsessed' With Bondage, Sorority

Published March 01, 2010

| FoxNews.com

The government scientist blamed for the 2001 anthrax attacks was a secret cross-dresser who cultivated an obsession with bondage and blindfolding as well as the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority, recently released FBI documents show. 

The FBI has made public thousands of pages of records detailing police reports, e-mails and other files pertaining to Bruce Ivins, who committed suicide in 2008. 

The documents paint the picture of a troubled government employee who battled his peculiar obsessions until he died, all the while plotting the deadly attacks. 

One FBI document from November 2007 detailed Ivins' reaction when he was told search warrants were being executed for his materials at several locations. Asked by an agent whether he was worried, Ivins said "he does things a 'middle age man should not do' and that those things would 'not be acceptable to most people,'" according to the file. 

Ivins told the agent that he kept a "bag of material that he uses to 'cross-dress'" in his basement. 

The agent told Ivins that the authorities were not there to "judge him." 

In an interview two months later, Ivins disclosed that he was obsessed with blindfolding and bondage and had opened a P.O. Box in Frederick, Md., in the early 1990s to receive "literature" on the topic. 

"One such magazine he received was 'Bondage Life,'" the report said. Ivins also told authorities that he corresponded with an unnamed individual, or individuals, from Indiana on a "regular basis" about the subject and exchanged photos of "blindfolded and bound women." 

Ivins said he "made a pact with himself" to stop using the address once he turned 60, according to the report. 

In the same interview, Ivins explained in detail his obsession with the KKG sorority. It started in the early 1960s when at the University of Cincinnati he asked out a member of the sorority and she turned him down. 

"Ivins soon became obsessed with all aspects of that sorority," the FBI report said. 

The obsession started off as relatively mild. Ivins compiled a list of locations of "dozens and dozens and dozens" of KKG chapters in the eastern part of the country. 

But from there, he started visiting those houses and eventually breaking into them. The FBI report said that between 1976 and 1978, he broke into a KKG house at the University of North Carolina so he could steal their "ritual material" and the "cypher" device used to decode it. 

Ivins also confessed to breaking into the KKG house at West Virginia University a few years later and stealing similar material, but said he mailed it back after he copied the "ritual book." 

The former scientist kept the visits from his wife, according to the report. He would travel to the sorority houses when she was away. 

He later tried to part ways with that element of his past, throwing away "everything" KKG-related "some time after 9/11." 

The anthrax mailings were responsible for the deaths of five people. 

Click here to read the FBI's documents on Ivins.

URL

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2010/03/01/anthrax-letter-scientist-obsessed-bondage-sorority