Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich might resign from office as early as Monday, the state's Attorney General said. 

"We have heard that there is a possibility that tomorrow he will make an announcement that he will step aside," Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan said during an appearance Sunday on NBC's Meet the Press.

Madigan said Blagojevich -- who has been charged with attempting to sell President-elect Barack Obama's vacated U.S. Senate seat to the highest bidder -- faces two options. He can resign or temporarily remove himself from office -- an option provided in the Illinois state constitution.

Madigan said she did not know which option Blagojevich will choose.

"I don't know if that means he will resign or take another option that's provided under the Illinois constitution where he can voluntarily recognize that there is a serious impediment in his ability to carry out his duties and therefore temporarily remove himself," she said.

If Blagojevich opts to temporarily remove himself, he can potentially keep his salary, Madigan said.

But the governor -- who has so far ignored all calls for his resignation -- remains "upbeat" and "positive," his spokesman said over the weekend.

The Illinois Attorney General has also asked the state Supreme Court to declare Blagojevich unfit for office -- a request that is unprecedented in Illinois state history.

Madigan called the move an "extraordinary request," but defended it saying "these are extraordinary circumstances." She said Blagojevich's continued presence is paralyzing state government and its ability to secure short-term loans needed to operate.

She is also calling for a special election to fill the empty Senate seat. 

"I think that's the appropriate way to go at this point obviously because of the taint that's been brought about by Blagojevich attempting to try to sell the Senate seat allegedly.. .that's the best thing for the people in the state," she said.   

The Associated Press contributed to this report.