MANCHESTER, N.H. -- Hillary Clinton's campaign is due for a significant shake-up after an expected defeat in New Hampshire in Tuesday's first-in-the-nation primary.Senior Clinton sources told FOX News that no one will be fired who has been part of Clinton's effort to date, but numerous advisers from Bill Clinton's White House and presidential campaigns will take on voluntary advisory roles likely to overshadow the input of Hillary's current team.

Among those now expected to join Hillary's post-New Hampshire team: Hillary's former Chief of Staff Maggie Williams, former Clinton White House political adviser Doug Sosnick and high-profile Democratic ad specialist Roy Spence.

The Clinton campaign has engaged in frequent conversations with former top Bill Clinton political advisers James Carville and Paul Begala and is eager to bring them aboard. FOX News first reported that Hillary was actively considering bringing Carville and Begala into the fold as volunteer, day-to-day advisers.

Carville and Begala have denied seeking or anticipating any role in Hillary's campaign. But senior Clinton sources say the move remains under active considertion and is driven by President Clinton's intense desire to revamp Hillary's flagging bid for the presidency.

Carville, sources said, drafted and submitted to Hillary's campaign a memo outlining how to turn her effort around. Carville speaks frequently with Bill Clinton and lately no topic, sources say, has been higher on th agenda than the state of Hillary's campaign.

The Clinton shake-up could occur as early as tonight, though the announcement may not be immeidate.

Clinton's senior strategist, Mark Penn, will remain on the campaign, as will current campaign manager Patti Solis Doyle, though their roles will be less prominent in the wider circle of advisers Hillary now intends to bring on board.

All the new volunteer advisers are believed to be committed to Hillary through the Feb. 5 national primary.

Many other prominent Democrats from Bill Clinton's political past have turned down roles in Hillary's campaign, fearing it may be impossible to turn her star-crossed effort around.

The shakeup appears to be a last-ditch effort to revive Clinton's fortunes and give her contributers and supporters some rason for hope after two devestating early defeats.

Mike Emanuel currently serves as chief congressional correspondent for FOX News Channel (FNC). He joined FNC in 1997 as a Los Angeles-based correspondent.