Zoo Animal 'Enrichment' Programs

  • 0322090948_M_zoo_enrichment1.jpg
    A mandrill named Ushindi shows his teeth as he puts his feet and hands on the glass before an enrichment session at the Franklin Park Zoo in Boston. All of the nation's zoos now have enrichment programs, some even mandated by the federal government.

    AP
  • 0322090948_M_zoo_enrichment2.jpg
    A giraffe eats hay and lettuce from a wire basket during an enrichment session at the Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence, R.I.

    AP
  • 0322090948_M_zoo_enrichment3.jpg
    An anteater uses its tongue to retrieve food bits in an object designed to simulate foraging in the wild during an enrichment session at the Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence, R.I.

    AP
  • 0322090948_M_zoo_enrichment4.jpg
    Senior Zookeepers Rachel Teran, left, and Brandi Baitchman examine a gorilla named Gigi, sitting behind glass during an enrichment exercise at the Franklin Park Zoo.

    AP
  • 0322090948_M_zoo_enrichment5.jpg
    A gorilla swings on a rope in its exhibit at the Franklin Park Zoo in Boston. Not long ago, zoos thought keeping animals alive and healthy meant serving food in bowls and giving them limited physical activities out of fear of injury. Now all of the nation's zoos have enrichment programs, some even mandated by the federal government.

    AP
  • 0322090948_M_zoo_enrichment6.jpg
    A snow leopard paws at a box containing a meatball during an enrichment session at the Roger Williams Park Zoo in Providence, R.I.

    AP

 

 

Advertisement

Slideshows

Close